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Climate Watch

Linked Open Data: The Essentials. The climate knowledge brokering edition

<p><span style="color: #3a3a3a; font-family: Quattrocento, serif; font-size: 16px;">This &nbsp;new edition of REEEP’s highly successful manual Linked Open Data: The Essentials offers a solid introduction to Linked Open Data (LOD) principles, with new case studies and updated information on how to make the most of the possibilities LOD has to offer. The manual is particularly targeted at knowledge brokers working in the climte change sector, with most of the examples and case studies focused on this area, but the general principles are broadly applicable to other disciplines and sectors.</span></p>

16 Jun 2017 03:55:20 GMT

Making governance work for water-energy-food nexus approaches

<p>This new working paper by Andrew Scott of ODI explores the effectiveness of governing for the “water-energy-food nexus” of issues. The author looks at approaches that understand the links between sectors, recognise these in decision-making and promote integrated policy-making.</p><p>The concept of the water–energy–food (WEF) nexus has become widely used to help understand interdependencies among the three systems, and how they can be managed sustainably to meet growing demand. The water–energy–food nexus has especially been advocated to address conflicts among the sectors. However, governance in the water–energy–food nexus has not received much attention in the literature, particularly the institutions and politics governing the water–energy–food sectors.</p><p>This&nbsp;paper&nbsp;synthesises findings from CDKN-supported action research in this area. The paper draws from findings in Indonesia, Kenya and the Amazon Basin to show that the effectiveness of the horizontal (cross-sectoral) and vertical (between levels of government) coordination that is essential for a nexus approach is determined by institutional relationships, which can be influenced by political economy factors. The capacity of governing organisations to understand nexus links and to collaborate with each other is also critical.</p><p>The paper suggests that aiming for the ideal of comprehensiveness and integration in a nexus approach may be costly and impractical. Nevertheless, horizontal and vertical coordination are essential. Local-level decision-making will determine how trade-offs and synergies in the water–energy–food nexus are implemented. The capacities of local government organisations and decision-makers need to be strengthened to enhance their capacity to adopt nexus approaches and coordinate vertically.</p>

15 Jun 2017 11:25:52 GMT

Village savings and loans associations: an approach adapted to the poorest households?

<p>To improve preparedness and prevention of drought risks in the agricultural and pastoral communities around Lake Fitri in Chad, Solidarités International implemented a project between 2013 and 2016 that endeavoured to strengthen their capacities for resilience. One of the activities more specifically concerned women and addressed their need to access credit in order for them to launch merchant activities: Solidarités International supported the creation of 15 Village Savings and Loans Associations (VSLA), based on the existing tontine model and inspired by VSL Associates’ methodology. The associations are made up of between 15 and 30 members, are presided over by internal regulations drawn up by its members and run for a cycle of 9 to 12 months. Members buy shares &nbsp;on a weekly basis and are able to take out a loan with interest for up to three times their individual total savings.</p><p>This case study presents the VSLA methodology in more details, and attempts to shed light on the socio-economic profile of the members (does the activity incorporate the poorest households?), on how the latter use the loans granted, on whether participation in a VSLA can improve the resilience of member households, and on the determinants of success.</p>

13 Jun 2017 10:39:32 GMT

Integrated marine and coastal management in the western Indian Ocean: towards a sustainable oceans economy

<div>The Western Indian Ocean (WIO) region has valuable and diverse coastal and marine resources, but much of its natural capital is either threatened or declining. The WIO encompasses rich diverse tropical and subtropical areas along the coastlines of Somalia, Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique and South Africa. This region also comprises vast oceanic areas and the island states of Madagascar, Seychelles, Comoros, Mauritius and Réunion. This paper focuses on the marine and coastal governance of mainland states in the region. As countries in the WIO region gear for a sustainable oceans economy, there is an urgent need for effective tools to ensure the resilience of coastal and marine biodiversity, to regulate sustainable resource use and to protect the livelihoods of millions of people. To achieve this, anticipatory approaches such as ecosystem-based, integrated resource management and coastal and marine spatial planning need to be used to promote sustainable Blue Economy pathways in the WIO, and facilitate the management of ecosystems and biodiversity in regional spatial planning. This essentially consists of designating and expanding effective marine protected areas (MPAs) and other priority areas for conservation, as well as including community-based models for sustainable management.</div><div><br />This paper addresses some key governance challenges in the WIO region related to the inclusive management needed to ensure that resource management approaches, specifically in and around MPAs, produce outcomes for nature and for people. Key to their success is the ability to demonstrate and enhance socio-economic development benefits and to communicate these benefits through thorough economic valuations. Attention must focus not only on expanding protected areas’ coverage but also on enhancing the capacity of management agencies and communities to govern conservation spaces effectively and attract sustainable, long-term financing. Collaborative partnerships around the conservation and sustainable management of in-shore marine resources</div><div>can significantly contribute to meeting the region’s national development targets, the AU’s Agenda 2063, the commitments set out in the 2030 global development agenda and the Aichi targets of the UN’s Convention on Biological Diversity.</div>

09 Jun 2017 03:06:34 GMT

‘Pudumai’ -Innovation and institutional churning in India’s informal economy: A report from the field

<p>Despite the fact that the informal economy accounts for about two thirds of GDP and 90% of employment in India , the informal economy seems absent from almost all discussions of any kind of low carbon revolution in the country. Does it play such a negligible role in pollution as many have assumed and would it be an obstacle to a low carbon revolution. This paper focuses on the sector’s own capacity to adopt the kind of technological and organisational changes that would be needed in order to innovate and asks whether and how innovation takes place in the informal economy.&nbsp;</p>

30 May 2017 06:06:39 GMT

Climate data and projections: supporting evidence-based decision-making in the Caribbean

<div>Governments in the Caribbean recognise climate variability and change to be the most significant threat to sustainable development in the region. Policies and strategies, such as the regional framework for achieving development resilient to climate change and its implementation plan, acknowledge the scale of the threat and provide a plan that aspires to safeguard regional prosperity and meet development goals. To do this, decision-makers need effective tools and methods to help integrate climate change considerations into their planning and investment processes. To build resilience, decision-makers can benefit from access to appropriate climate change data that are specific to their geographical location and relevant to their planning horizons.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The CARibbean Weather Impacts Group (CARIWIG) project, funded by the Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), gives access to climate data that have been downscaled, making them relevant for use in the Caribbean region. The project also provides tools that allow decision-makers to better understand the potential impacts of drought, tropical storms, rainfall and temperature changes. Caribbean decision-makers, researchers andscientists can access this data freely, through the CARIWIG website.<div>&nbsp;</div><div>This policy brief provides an overview of CARIWIG data and information and how they can be used, pointing to illustrative examples of how they have been applied in several Caribbean countries. It also provides decision-makers with the tools necessary to make effective climate decisions in the face of uncertainty.</div></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><div>Key messages:</div><div><ul><li>Climate data and projections that are relevant to the Caribbean region are available through the online CARIWIG portal</li><li>Historical climate data and future projections are available for a range of climate variables</li><li>A suite of simulation tools, including a weather generator, a tropical storm model and a regional drought analysis tool are also freely available</li><li>these resources are useful for decision makers. When combined with other data and information, they can help to build a picture of potential impacts to key economic sectors in the Caribbean</li><li>a series of case studies shows how these resources have been applied to real-world situations in Caribbean countries</li><li>the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) is providing training and support on how to use CARIWIG outputs</li><li>CDKN-funded projects provide methods and tools for decision makers to take proactive action to build climate resilience, despite the uncertainty that comes with future climate projections</li></ul></div></div>

24 Mar 2017 01:45:23 GMT

Electricity supply in South Africa: Path dependency or decarbonisation?

<p>Renewable energy technologies have experienced an exponential growth in South Africa, thanks to the procurement of large-scale power plants. However, South Africa’s electricity sector still lacks a level playing field. Significant vested interests have maintained overwhelming support for centralised, coal-based electricity generation, preventing the development of renewable energy technologies to their optimal potential. Active efforts are required to enhance the transformation of electricity supply in the country by truly incorporating the low-carbon transition in electricity planning, opening the policy space for the development of embedded generation, and phasing out fossil fuel subsidies.</p><p>The electricity sector in South Africa is a highly contested space. The emergence of renewable energy technologies (along with energy efficiency and other demand-side management opportunities) has generated healthy revitalisation and disturbance of the status quo in the industry. Discussions around other technologies, such as gas-to-power and nuclear energy, are also adding to this vibrant dynamics. Significant vested interests are still at play alongside massive state support to maintain the domination of the coal industry over the electricity supply industry in South Africa. <br /><br />Active efforts are required to provide a level playing field for all energy technologies and enhance the transformation of electricity supply in the country. This includes truly incorporating the low-carbon transition in electricity planning, open the policy space for the development of embedded generation and phase out fossil fuel subsidies.</p>

14 Mar 2017 02:06:58 GMT

Innovative risk finance solutions – Insights for geothermal power development in Kenya and Ethiopia

<p>Geothermal development is on the rise in many regions of the world.&nbsp;However, the high costs of field development, coupled with the high risks associated with resource exploration and drilling, still pose a significant barrier to private sector financing.</p><p>Insurance can mitigate the risks to investors&nbsp;and increase flows of private finance to the industry.</p><p>A project by Parhelion, a private sector insurance and risk company focused on climate finance, funded by CDKN, aimed to improve the technical capacity of Kenya’s and Ethiopia’s local insurance industries for using geothermal risk mitigation instruments.</p><p>A consultative process with relevant stakeholders in these countries yielded insights and recommendations for international, multilateral and bilateral institutions that are looking to support geothermal resource development. The analysis was enriched by E3G’s expertise in analysing climate finance flows.</p><p>The study found that international, multilateral and bilateral institutions should:</p><ul><li><strong>Support technical assistance and capacity building</strong>, which takes into account the needs of all relevant stakeholders involved within specific country and market contexts.</li></ul><ul><li><strong>Provide targeted concessional finance&nbsp;</strong>by taking into account all possible risk mitigation instruments during project development, and by envisioning the leverage of private finance as early as possible.</li></ul><ul><li>U<strong>se insurance&nbsp;</strong><strong>instruments</strong>&nbsp;to target specific, well defined risks: this can offer very high leverage ratios on the use of public funds, and crowd in private sector insurance capital.</li></ul>

02 Mar 2017 01:44:39 GMT

Climate impacts on agriculture and tourism – the case for climate resilient investment in the Caribbean

<p>For the Caribbean, climate change is not tomorrow’s problem. The threats it poses are neither distant nor abstract – they are already apparent. In recent years, hurricanes have caused major damage in countries such as Jamaica, Grenada and Cuba; severe flooding has hit Belize and Guyana; and droughts affect much of the east of the region. The small island state of Saint Lucia alone has faced 27 natural disasters between 1980 and 2008, with total economic damage reaching an estimated US$2.5 billion. The need for investment to build climate resilience in the Caribbean has never been greater.</p><p>These impacts are putting considerable strain on the finances of national governments, businesses and citizens, and threaten regional prosperity and development. The Commonwealth Expert Group on Climate Finance has said that climate change is already reversing some of the gains on poverty alleviation and economic growth that have been made in the Caribbean.</p><p>Over the past decade, research funded by the Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) has provided fresh insight into the nature of the climate threat to the Caribbean. Researchers have developed regionally downscaled climate change projections and climate visualisation tools providing information that can be used to make informed decisions at the subregional level. This information has been used in conjunction with a range of other tools, and has been applied to real-life situations in Caribbean nations including Saint Lucia, Jamaica, Barbados, Belize and Cuba.</p><p>Focusing on the agriculture and tourism sectors, this document identifies some of the most pressing issues and climate vulnerabilities facing Caribbean states. It makes the case that climate resilience investment by governments, businesses and development partners is urgently needed to</p><p><strong>Key messages</strong></p><ul><li>&nbsp;Climate variability and change are already having severe impacts on key sectors including agriculture and tourism.</li><li>These impacts are reversing economic growth, exacerbating poverty and undermining the future prosperity of Caribbean countries.</li><li>CDKN research has provided locally appropriate climate change projections that give fresh insight into the vulnerability of key sectors.</li><li>Adaptation investment in the agriculture sector is needed to account for projected changes in rainfall and growing seasons, and occurrence of extreme events, especially drought.</li><li>Adaptation investment in the tourism sector is also needed to build resilience to rising seas, bleached coral reefs, water scarcity and gradual temperature increase.</li><li>There are many potential adaptation measures that can be applied by governments, businesses, individuals and development partners.</li><li>Financial support is needed to support adaptation action as high up-front costs are a barrier to local adaptation efforts.</li><li>Effectively prioritising adaptation options can maximise their value and lead to positive co-benefits for individuals, businesses and society.</li></ul>

28 Feb 2017 05:42:54 GMT

Driving, connecting and communicating: The many roles of national government in climate adaptation planning

<p>Climate change is one of the most significant challenges to the Caribbean’s future prosperity. The impacts of climate change on economically important sectors such as tourism, agriculture and fishing threaten Caribbean nations’ ability to achieve their economic and social development goals. By 2050, the costs to the region are expected to reach US$22 bn each year; this represents 10% of regional gross domestic product, based on 2004 figures.&nbsp;Paying for recovery efforts after natural disasters causes significant budgetary pressures and diverts funds from other pressing development issues such as health and education. However, responding to climate challenges is highly complex. Climate change has cross-cutting impacts that span sectors and spatial scales, and involves multiple stakeholders. Delivering effective climate change adaptation is therefore a question of governance.</p><p>Bottom-up, community-level approaches are important in meeting the challenges that climate change poses, but in isolation they are insufficient. National governance frameworks must foster community action, but also provide the enabling environment for large investments and transformative change at scale. The challenge that national governments face is to coordinate adaptation interventions at both national and local levels by engaging multiple organisations and individuals.</p><p>Targeted primarily at Caribbean policy-makers, this&nbsp;<em>Information Brief&nbsp;</em>draws on the experience of three CDKN-funded projects that have taken place in the region over the last decade. It identifies ‘best practice’ lessons on governance, highlights examples from applied case studies in Caribbean countries, and recommends tools and methods that can be applied to make governance frameworks more effective at delivering climate compatible development. It is also a gateway to the reports and tools that have been produced under these CDKN-funded projects.</p><p><strong>Key messages</strong></p><ul><li>Policy and governance arrangements at the national level are vital for climate adaptation. Local action is im&shy;portant but is insufficient in isolation.</li><li>National governments provide stra&shy;tegic oversight and access to climate finance, and have the capacity and authority to drive climate action.</li><li>Climate change considerations should be integrated into policies and plans across government departments. The CCORAL tool allows decision-makers to do this.</li><li>Institutional arrangements are vital to help translate government policy into action. Governments can use the ARIA toolkit to assess their institutional adaptive capacity as a first step to strengthening these frameworks.</li><li>Government institutions are vital in stimulating action at the local level. Networked governance arrangements can help to build movements for cli&shy;mate resilience that translate national priorities into local action and inte&shy;grate local needs into national policy.</li></ul>

28 Feb 2017 05:15:12 GMT

Africa’s climate: helping decision-makers make sense of climate information

<div>African decision-makers need reliable, accessible, and trustworthy information about the continent’s climate, and how this climate might change in future, if they are to plan appropriately to meet the region’s development challenges.</div><div><br />This report is designed as a guide for scientists, policy-makers, and practitioners on the continent. The research in this report, written by leading experts in their fields, presents an overview of climate trends across central, eastern, western, and southern Africa, and is distilled into a series of factsheets that are tailored for specific sub-regions and countries. Some of these capture the current state of knowledge, while others explore the ‘burning scientific questions’ that still need to be answered.</div>

24 Feb 2017 01:53:41 GMT

Zombie energy: climate benefits of ending subsidies to fossil fuel production

<div>Ending subsidies to fossil fuel production is often a missing piece of comprehensive climate action plans. To implement the 2015 Paris Agreement and keep climate change well below 2oC, the world needs both supply-side policies (such as removal of fossil fuel production subsidies, moratoriums and “no-go zones” or coal phase-out) and demand-side policies (such as carbon pricing, removal of fossil fuel consumption subsidies, or fuel and energy efficiency standards).</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><div>This report sheds light on the potential climate benefits of the removal of fossil fuel production subsidies in terms of both greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions and the oil, gas and coal reserves that could become uneconomical to produce. The paper explains how different production subsidies currently unlock “zombie energy” from fossil fuel deposits that would not be commercially viable to produce without government support. It also presents new modelling of the global removal of certain subsidies to fossil fuel production.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The report is structured as follows:</div><div><ul><li>chapter 1 explains why fossil fuel production subsidies matter for climate change. The chapter also defines and categorises fossil fuel production subsidies</li><li>chapter 2 outlines how different subsidies influence investment decisions related to fossil fuel production</li><li>chapter 3 discusses modelling of a removal of fossil fuel production subsidies and inputs of the GSI-IF (p) global model</li><li>chapter 4 presents results of new modelling that shows how much coal, oil and gas could become uneconomical to produce—and the GHG emission reductions that would result—if certain fossil fuel production subsidies are removed globally</li></ul></div><div>The report concludes with a summary of the findings as well as opportunities for further research on the climate benefits of fossil fuel subsidy removal.</div></div>

24 Feb 2017 01:33:43 GMT

National climate change governance: topic guide

<div>The full brunt of cumulative greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions will be felt over the years to come but climate change impacts are already here. Fifteen of the 16 warmest years on record (since 1880) have occurred since 2001. At the same time, Hallegatte et al. (2016) estimate that, without the rapid implementation of pro-poor, climate-informed development policies, climate change impacts could result in 100 million more people in extreme poverty by 2030. The world’s poor are more vulnerable to loss of critical assets, health risks and food insecurity from drought or price shocks. To address these risks, development policies must consider climate risk scenarios while expanding ‘no-regrets’ social protection programmes that provide benefits to vulnerable populations under different climate scenarios.</div><div><br />This Topic Guide looks at climate change governance and the political economy of climate policy development and implementation at the national scale. Its primary purpose is to help Department for International Development (DFID) staff better support country partners in implementing climate and sustainable development policy that is equitable, effective and coherent and that can adapt to changing circumstances. It highlights national procedural, policy, institutional, political, economicand social-behavioural challenges and identifies potential entry points for addressing them. It is intended for both climate change and governance advisors, hence covers issues and concepts that will be very familiar to one group but not necessarily the other.</div>

24 Feb 2017 01:24:14 GMT

Driving, connecting and communicating: the many roles of national government in climate adaptation planning

<div>Climate change is one of the most significant challenges to the Caribbean’s future prosperity. The impacts of climate change on economically important sectors such as tourism, agriculture and fishing threaten Caribbean nations’ ability to achieve their economic and social development goals. By 2050, the costs to the region are expected to reach US$22 bn each year; this represents 10% of regional gross domestic product, based on 2004 figures.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Paying for recovery efforts after natural disasters causes significant budgetary&nbsp; pressures and diverts funds from other pressing development issues such as health and&nbsp; education. However, responding to climate challenges is highly complex. Climate change has cross-cutting impacts that span sectors and spatial scales, and involves multiple stakeholders. Delivering effective climate change adaptation is therefore a question of governance.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Key messages:</div><div><ul><li><div>policy and governance arrangements at the national level are vital for climate adaptation. Local action is important but is insufficient in isolation</div></li><li><div>national governments provide strategic oversight and access to climate finance, and have the capacity and authority to drive climate action</div></li><li><div>climate change considerations should be integrated into policies and plans across government departments. The CCORAL tool allows decision-makers to do this</div></li><li><div>iInstitutional arrangements are vital to help translate government policy into action. Governments can use the ARIA toolkit to assess their institutional adaptive capacity as a first step to strengthening these frameworks</div></li><li><div>government institutions are vital in stimulating action at the local level. Networked governance arrangements can help to build movements for climate resilience that translate national priorities into local action and integrate local needs into national policy</div></li></ul></div>

21 Feb 2017 04:40:13 GMT

Climate impacts on agriculture and tourism: the case for climate resilient investment in the Caribbean

<div>For the Caribbean, climate change is not tomorrow’s problem. The threats it poses are neither distant nor abstract – they are already apparent. In recent years, hurricanes have caused major damage in countries such as Jamaica, Grenada and Cuba; severe flooding has hit Belize and Guyana; and droughts affect much of the east of the region.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The small island state of Saint Lucia alone has faced 27 natural disasters between 1980 and 2008, with total economic damage&nbsp; reaching an estimated US$2.5 billion. The need for investment to build climate resilience in the Caribbean has never been greater.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Key messages:<br /><div><ul><li>climate variability and change are already having severe impacts on key sectors including agriculture and tourism</li><li>these impacts are reversing economic growth, exacerbating poverty and undermining the future prosperity of Caribbean countries</li><li>CDKN research has provided locally appropriate climate change projections that give fresh insight into the vulnerability of key sectors</li><li><div>adaptation investment in the agriculture sector is needed to account for projected changes in rainfall and growing seasons, and</div><div>occurrence of extreme events, especially drought</div></li><li><div>adaptation investment in the tourism sector is also needed to build resilience to rising seas, bleached coral reefs, water scarcity and gradual temperature increase</div></li><li><div>there are many potential adaptation measures that can be applied by governments, businesses, individuals and development</div><div>partners</div></li><li><div>financial support is needed to support adaptation action as high up-front costs are a barrier to local adaptation efforts</div></li><li><div>effectively prioritising adaptation options can maximise their value and lead to positive co-benefits for individuals, businesses and society</div></li></ul></div></div>

21 Feb 2017 04:30:44 GMT

Display Next Eldis Climate Change [eldis.org]

The Nagoya Protocol on access to genetic resources and benefit sharing: User-country measures and implementation in India

<p>User-measure requirements are the cornerstone of the Nagoya Protocol on Access to Genetic Resources and the Fair and Equitable Sharing of Benefits Arising from their Utilization developed under the Convention on Biological Diversity. These have come about as the result of hard, persistent pressure from developing countries on developed countries to take co-responsibility in making the access and benefit sharing regime functional. The degree of national implementation of the user measure requirements will thus be an important indicator of the success of the Nagoya Protocol. This report reviews these requirements and the situations as regards national implementation so far. It reviews the&nbsp; status and options for India in its implementation and notes some future challenges.</p>

30 Nov 2016 05:22:23 GMT

The ocean and us: how healthy marine and coastal ecosystems support the achievement of the UN Sustainable Development Goals

<p>The ocean has been a cornerstone of human development throughout the history of civilization. People continue to come to the coasts to build some of the largest cities on the planet, with thriving economies, culture and communities. Ocean and coastal ecosystems provide us with resources and trade opportunities that greatly benefit human well-being.</p><p>These benefits are often taken for granted as we fail to recognize their underlying value. In our narrow pursuit of progress through purely economic and social development we often fail to protect the health of our marine system that we depend upon. Today, however, we increasingly realize the importance of healthy ecosystems for sustainable development that is reflected in the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) recently adopted by the United Nations. We can no longer afford to apply an antagonistic paradigm between development and conservation. The SDG framework provides the world with the opportunity to transform how we think about the ‘Oceans and Us’.</p><p>This publication highlights the critical contribution of healthy marine and coastal ecosystems to achieving the SDGs and describes the role of credible and accessible data, well communicated knowledge generated through dialogue with users, in supporting informed decision-making.</p>

23 Sep 2016 12:53:59 GMT

Mesophotic coral ecosystems - a lifeboat for coral reefs?

<p>The shallow coral reefs that we all know, are like the tip of an iceberg - they are the more visible part of an extensive coral ecosystem that reaches into depths far beyond where most people visit.&nbsp; The invisible reefs, known as mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs) are widespread and diverse, however they remain largely unexplored in most parts of the world.&nbsp; With the global climate heating up, the world’s shallow coral reefs are predicted to experience increasing levels of catastrophic bleaching. This report asks the question – can MCEs provide a “life boat” for shallow coral reefs that are suffering decimation from rising sea surface temperatures and other anthropogenic impacts?</p><p>Picture a coral reef — most people will probably imagine brightly coloured corals, fish and other animals swimming in well-lit shallow waters. In fact, the coral reefs that live close to the surface of the sea — the ones that we can swim, snorkel, or dive near and see from space — are only a small portion of the complete coral reef ecosystem. Light-dependent corals can live in much deeper water (up to a depth of 150 m in clear waters). The shallow coral reefs from the surface of the sea to 30–40&nbsp; m below are more like the tip of an iceberg; they are the more visible part of an extensive coral ecosystem that reaches into depths far beyond where most people visit. These intermediate depth reefs, known as mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs), are the subject of this report.</p>

23 Sep 2016 01:49:16 GMT

Climate change threatens Hawaiian forest birds

<p>In Hawai'i, geograpahic isolation has prevented the natural establishment of mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and many insect species, such as biting mosquitoes. Isolation has also facilitated the spectacular evolutionary radiation of Hawaiian honeycreepers from a single small flock of North American finches into more than 50 species and subspecies of endemic forest birds.</p><div data-canvas-width="66.57703962794942">With the arrival of humans came the clearing of forests and the introduction of non-native species and their diseases. More than 40 mosquito species have been intercepted in Hawai‘i, and six have become established, most recently in 2004.</div><div data-canvas-width="66.57703962794942">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="66.57703962794942"><div data-canvas-width="138.95338297265158">As global warming raises air temperatures, their seasonal high elevation refuge will shrink and eventually disappear. It is likely that the spread of mosquitoes and avian malaria (as well as avian pox) into the high elevations of Hawai'i will eventually lead to the extinct ion of many, perhaps all, of the honeycreepers that currently survive in these areas.</div></div><div data-canvas-width="138.95338297265158">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="138.95338297265158"><div data-canvas-width="205.90692343899823">Unfortunately, the rate of warming in Hawai‘i may not give these birds enough time to develop resistance. Without human assistance, global warming combined with avian malaria may overwhelm Hawai'i honeycreepers and other forest bird species.</div></div>

22 Sep 2016 10:23:43 GMT

CITES alone cannot combat illegal wildlife trade

<p>The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) will address the growing threat from illegal trade at its forthcoming Conference of the Parties (CoP17). CITES is a regulatory treaty that is neither self-executing nor legally binding unless its provisions are reproduced in member states’ laws. Approximately half the parties still need to develop legislation to strengthen their implementation of the convention; 10 of the 17 parties designated by the CITES Secretariat as needing priority attention are in Africa. There is thus opportunity to harmonise legal frameworks for more effective CITES implementation. While parties improve their environmental laws, the secretariat can foster transregional consensus on trade controls, improve synergy with other conventions in the context of environmental crime, prioritise support to CITES scientific and management authorities in high- biodiversity countries, especially those subject to trade suspensions for non-compliance, and recommend raising penalties for illegal transactions in wildlife commodities known to finance conflict.</p>

09 Sep 2016 02:56:25 GMT

The 2016 World Conservation Congress: exploring a win–win agenda for people and the planet

<div data-canvas-width="523.7833333333333">The World Conservation Congress (WCC), one of the world’s largest environmental gatherings, is convened every four years under the auspices of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) to find collaborative solutions to conserve global biodiversity and ecosystems, and harness the solutions nature offers to global development challenges.<br /><br /></div><div data-canvas-width="522.8166666666668">The WCC convenes in Honolulu, Hawai’i from 1–10 September 2016. The congress will include the IUCN’s 1 300 member organisations from across 161 countries, all seeking to develop the conservation and governance responses necessary to tackle the drivers of biodiversity loss. At the WCC, IUCN members representing government, the private sector and civil society will vote on motions and resolutions that lay out the global conservation agenda for the next four years. The 100 proposed motions are aligned with the overarching objectives of valuing and conserving nature, ensuring the effective and equitable governance of its use, and deploying nature-based solutions to global challenges in climate, food and development.</div><div data-canvas-width="522.8166666666668">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="522.8166666666668">Recommendations:</div><div data-canvas-width="522.8166666666668"><ul><li>the IUCN, and its 2017-2020 Programme, must support the overarching objectives of the post-2015 UN development agenda and seek to establish an international framework for ecosystem-based climate action</li><li>African stakeholders must call for clearly identified roles and responsibilities, and associated action plans, to enhance the ownership of resolutions and support their implementation</li><li>African members must ensure consolidated voting positions, aligned with rigorous scientific data, which highlight the continent’s most important and vulnerable ecosystems and biodiversity</li></ul></div><div data-canvas-width="522.8166666666668">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="522.8166666666668">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="522.8166666666668">&nbsp;</div>

09 Sep 2016 02:48:52 GMT

Global climate change impacts on Pacific Islands terrestrial biodiversity: a review

<p>The islands of the Pacific region hold three of the 35 global biodiversity hotspots with large numbers of endemic species. Global climate change will exacerbate the challenges faced by the biodiversity of this region . In this review, the authors identify trends in characteristics for 305 terrestrial species threatened by climate change and severe weather according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN). We then review the literature on observed and potential impacts of climate change on terrestrial biodive rsity , focusing on the species'€™ characteristics that were identified. High - elevation ecosystems such as cloud montane forests are projected to disappear entirely by the year 2100 , with corresponding global losses of their endemic biodiversity. Sea level ri se threatens restricted range species on small low - lying atolls. Shifts in distribution may be possible for generalist species , but r ange shifts will be difficult for species with small distributions, specialized habitat requirements, slow dispersal rates , and species at high elevations.</p><p>Accurate assessments of climate change impacts on biodiversity of the region are difficult because of confusion about nomenclature , the many species unknown to science, the lack of baseline data on species'€™ ecology and distributions, and lack of fine resolution elevation data for very small islands. Furthermore, synergistic interactions of climate change with other threats like habitat loss and invasive species have not been comprehensively assessed. Addressing these knowledge gaps will be difficult for Pacific island nations due to limited financial resources and expertise.</p>

18 Aug 2016 11:00:54 GMT

The State of Biodiversity in Latin America and the Caribbean: a mid-term review of progress towards the Aichi Biodiversity Targets

<p>Global Biodiversity Outlook-4, the mid-term review of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020, provided a global assessment of progress towards the attainment of the Plan’s global biodiversity goals<br />and associated Aichi Biodiversity Targets, but contained limited regional information. <br /><br />This report builds on and complements the global GBO-4 assessment. It is the second edition of the State of Biodiversity in<br />the Latin America and the Caribbean report and serves as a near mid-term review of progress towards the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 for the Latin America and the Caribbean region.<br /><br />The report draws on a set of regional indicators, information from fifth national reports to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), other national and regional reports, case studies and published literature, to provide a target-by-target review of progress towards the twenty Aichi Biodiversity Targets. As much as possible, global indicators for Aichi Biodiversity Targets have beenbroken down to regional level and some additional analyses of existing global information have been undertaken with key national institutions in the region. However, limitations in data have meant that some datasets, which do not extend past 2011, have been included to illustrate that relevant information exists, but further efforts to update this information are needed.</p><p>The key messages about the state of biodiversity in the Latin America and Caribbean region, and the pressures upon it, which have emerged from this assessment are:<br /><br /></p><ul><li>declines in species abundance and high risks of species extinctions continue</li><li>rates of habitat loss in Latin America and the Caribbean have slowed but remain high</li><li>certain pressures associated with rapid economic growth and social inequities are impacting the region’s natural resources</li><li>agricultural expansion and intensification to increase both livestock, arable and commodities production continue</li><li>the region is undergoing major infrastructure development of dams and roads</li><li>the impacts on biodiversity of high concentrations of population in urban areas are particularly significant within the region</li><li>country economies within the region are very highly dependent on natural resources</li><li>resource extraction for minerals and hydrocarbons has, in some cases, led to locally devastating direct and indirect impacts on biodiversity such as vegetation removal, water and soil pollution and contamination</li><li>transboundary and local air pollution is now recognised as an environmental factor in human health in the region</li><li>climate change induced impacts on coral reefs and montane habitats within the region are now being observed</li></ul>

16 Aug 2016 04:40:28 GMT

The State of Biodiversity in Asia and the Pacific: a mid-term review of progress towards the Aichi Biodiversity Targets

<p>Global Biodiversity Outlook-4 (GBO-4), the mid-term review of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020, provided a global assessment of progress towards the attainment of the Plan’s global biodiversity goals and associated Aichi Biodiversity Targets, but contained limited regional information. <br /><br />This report builds on and complements the global GBO-4 assessment. This is the second edition of The State of Biodiversity in Asia and the Pacific report and serves as a near mid-term review of progress towards the Aichi Biodiversity Targets for the Asia Pacific region.<br /><br />The report draws on a set of regional indicators, information from fifth national reports to the CBD, other government reports, case studies and published literature, to provide a target by target review of progress towards the twenty Aichi Biodiversity Targets. As much as possible, global indicators for Aichi Biodiversity Targets have been broken down to regional level and some additional analyses of existing global information have been undertaken. However, limitations in data have meant that some datasets which do not extend past 2011 have been included to illustrate that relevant information exists, but that further efforts to update this information are needed.</p><p>The key messages about the state of biodiversity in the region, and the pressures upon it, which have emerged from this assessment are:</p><ul><li>the exceptional biodiversity in Asia and the Pacific continues to decline</li><li>combinations of human-induced factors are a key driver of biodiversity loss</li><li>Asia and the Pacific continue to experience deforestation and forest degradation</li><li>rapid growth in demand for wildlife products is fuelling unsustainable trade, with impacts inside and outside of the region</li><li>invasive alien species create particular pressures on the oceanic islands</li><li>marine ecosystems are vulnerable to growth in commercial and artisanal fisheries</li><li>te negative impacts of climate change on species and ecosystems are exacerbating the effects of other pressures on Asia and the Pacific’s biodiversity</li></ul>

16 Aug 2016 04:26:47 GMT

The State of Biodiversity in West Asia: a mid-term review of progress towards the Aichi Biodiversity Targets

<p>Global Biodiversity Outlook-4 (GBO-4), the mid-term review of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 , published by the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity (SCBD), provides a global assessment of progress towards the attainment of the Plan’s biodiversity goals and associated twenty Aichi Biodiversity Targets, but contains limited regional information.</p><p>This second edition of the State of Biodiversity in West Asia report builds on and complements the global GBO-4 assessment, serving as a near mid-term review of progress towards the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 for the West Asia region specifically. This report draws on a set of regional indicators, information from fifth national reports to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), other government reports, case studies and published literature, to provide a target by target review of progress towards the twenty Aichi Biodiversity Targets. As much as possible, global indicators for the Aichi Biodiversity Targets have been broken down to regional level and additional analyses of existing global information have been undertaken.</p><p>The key messages about the state of biodiversity in West Asia, and the pressures upon it, which have emerged from this assessment are:<br /><br /></p><ul><li>available biodiversity and ecosystem service information for the region is limited, which has made the reporting task challenging, and in many cases data are too poor and fragmentary to allow robust conclusions</li><li>the major drivers of biodiversity decline have seen a rapid increase, including urban expansion, the spread of intensive agricultural systems and cultivation of marginal land resulting from considerable population growth. Such changes necessitate reliance on resources imported from elsewhere in the world, meaning that West Asia’s ecological footprint is growing sharply and now exceeds the global average</li><li>the volatile political situation in parts of the region means&nbsp; conservation work has been unable to proceed in the countries or areas experiencing significant internal and international conflicts and political instability in recent years</li><li>protected areas networks in West Asia are limited in both coverage and management effectiveness</li><li>wildlife crime linked to hunting is a continuing problem with ineffective enforcement of regulations and legislation</li><li>water scarcity, driven by rapidly rising demand, is threatening the survival of the region’s wetland habitats</li><li>multiple anthropogenic and climatic pressures are interacting to threaten the integrity of marine ecosystems</li><li>the region is likely to be one of the hardest hit by the direct and indirect impacts of climate change such as sea level rise, sea temperature rise, increasing water scarcity and ground water salinity, and desertification</li></ul>

16 Aug 2016 04:17:22 GMT

The State of Biodiversity in Africa: a mid-term review of progress towards the Aichi Biodiversity Targets

<p>Global Biodiversity Outlook-4, the mid-term review of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 , provided a global assessment of progress towards the attainment of the Plan'€™s global biodiversity goals and associated Aichi Biodiversity Targets, but contained limited regional information. This report builds on and complements the global GBO-4 assessment. It is the second edition of the State of Biodiversity in Africa report and serves as a near mid-term review of progress towards the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 for the African region.</p><p>This report draws on a set of regional indicators, information from fifth national reports to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), other government reports, case studies and published literature, to provide a target by target review of progress towards the twenty Aichi Biodiversity Targets. As much as possible, global indicators for Aichi Biodiversity Targets have been broken down to regional level and some additional analyses of existing global information have been undertaken. However, limitations in data have meant that some datasets which do not extend past 2011 have been included to illustrate that relevant information exists, but that further efforts to update this information.</p><div data-canvas-width="233.58124999999998">The key messages about the state of biodiversity in Africa, and the pressures upon it, which have emerged from this assessment are:</div><div data-canvas-width="295.27616666666665"><ul><li>overall, biodiversity in Africa continues to decline, with ongoing losses of species and habitats</li><li>ongoing loss of biodiversity in Africa is driven by a combination of human-induced factors</li><li>Africa’s freshwater ecosystems and their biodiversity are especially threatened</li><li>Africa continues to experience deforestation and forest degradation</li><li>the negative impacts of climate change on species and ecosystems are exacerbating the effects of all these pressures</li><li>nonetheless the report identifies a number of important responses which have taken place since 2011</li><li>African countries are working collaboratively to address particular Aichi Biodiversity Targets</li><li>there is a growing portfolio of international support for African countries to achieve the Aichi Biodiversity Targets</li><li>African countries are using ecosystem service valuation and investment in REDD+ to achieve the Aichi Biodiversity Targets</li><li>many African countries have already achieved their 17% terrestrial protected area targets, and many others are working towards this target on land, as well as on the 10% marine protected areas target on the sea</li><li>Africa is making increasing use of ecosystem-based conservation and restoration of natural resources</li></ul></div>

16 Aug 2016 04:05:56 GMT

Seeing through fishers' lenses: Exploring marine ecological changes within Mafia Island Merine Park, Tanzania

<p>nsights from traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) of the marine environment are difficult to integrate into conventional science knowledge (CSK) initiatives. Where TEK is integrated into CSK at all, it is usually either marginalized or restricted to CSK modes of interpretation, hence limiting its potential contribution to the understanding of social-ecological systems. This study uses semi-directive interviews, direct observations, and structured open-ended questionnaires (n = 103) to explore TEK of marine ecological changes occurring within the Mafia Island Marine Park, Tanzania, and factors contributing to these changes. It illuminates TEK insights that can be valuable in parallel with CSK to provide a more nuanced understanding of ecological changes. In some areas, fishers observed coral reef growth, increased fish abundance, and increased sea temperatures, whereas in others, they reported decreases in sea level, coral cover, fish abundance, catch composition, catch quantities, and fish size. They associated these changes with interrelated factors emanating from environmental processes, conservation outcomes, marketing constraints, population dynamics, and disappearance of cultural traditions. Utilizing TEK without restricting it to CSK modes of interpretation has the potential to improve CSK initiatives by promoting complementarity and mutual enrichment between the two kinds of knowledge, thereby contributing new insights that may enhance adaptive management and resilience in social-ecological systems.</p>

12 Jun 2016 09:06:59 GMT

Dry-season greening of Amazon forests

<p>Evidence from ecological studies, eddy flux towers, and satellites shows that many tropical forests &lsquo;green up&rsquo; during higher sunlight annual dry seasons, suggesting they are more limited by light than water. Morton et al.reported that satellite-observed dry-season green up in Amazon forests is an artefact of seasonal variations in sun- sensor geometry.</p><p>However, here these researchers argue that even after artefact correction, data from Morton et al. show statistically significant increases in canopy greenness during the dry season. Integrating corrected satellite with ground observations indicates that dry-season forest greening is prevalent in Amazonia, probably reflecting large-scale seasonal upregulation of photosynthesis by canopy leaf dynamics.</p><p>[adapted from source]</p>

21 Mar 2016 07:31:29 GMT

Spotlight on publications: Brazil’s ethanol programme

<p>This Spotlight highlights some of the key publications that study, analyse and document Brazil&rsquo;s ethanol programme. The publications focus on the following specific issues: Brazilian government policies to promote the sector; sustainability issues; expansion, land use and agro-ecological zoning of sugarcane; bagasse, cogeneration and bioelectricity; and advanced biofuels. Together these resources highlight the current key issues surrounding the sector, offering a useful entry for readers from other regions who wish to understand the Brazilian experience with ethanol.</p>

16 Mar 2016 03:19:51 GMT

Traditional gender roles of men and women in natural resource conservation among the vhavenda people in Zimbabwe: implications for sustainable development

<p>Natural resource conservation is key to the concept of sustainable development, yet environmental pressures continue to increase, including soil degradation, water availability, and nutrient cycling. Within natural resource conservation, women play an equally essential, yet differentiated, role as men. This means that analysis of gender interactions in relation to environmental management is imperative for sustainable development. To this end, this journal paper explores&nbsp;the traditional gender roles of men and women in the conservation of natural resources among the vhavenda people in Zimbabwe. It seeks to draw lessons regarding participation, particularly of women, that can inform wider sustainable development efforts.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>African feminism and post- colonial theory were used as theoretical frameworks to analyse the practices of the vhavenda, while a Harvard analytic framework and the social relation approach to gender analysis were used as tools to map the gender roles in their conservation activities. The research also used a phenomenological research approach as part of the purely qualitative study, to ensure that understanding emerged directly from the experiences of the men and women themselves. In-depth, unstructured interviews were conducted with respondents aged seventy and above, with five females and three males interviewed in the Beit-Bridge district in south west Zimbabwe. This demographic was chosen for their extensive knowledge of traditional methods.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The research revealed that the type of resources that were of concern to the vhavenda people included soil, water, and specific plant species that were important sources of firewood, timber, and food. Certain trees are conserved for sacred and cultural reasons, with rules as to who can cut down trees, and how. Conservation of water was not gendered, with both men and women participating in actions such as fencing off water-sources from animals. Soil degradation prevention takes precedence over correction, with men cutting terraces to prevent soil erosion, and women planting grasses. Animal species conservation depended on availability, importance, and use, while the study also revealed that although women and men had different uses and benefits from natural resources, there was an ethic of cooperation, dialogue, and collaboration among men and women when it comes to resource conservation.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The study recommends that natural resource conservation in the context of sustainable development, that is, using modern technologies and methods, needs to embrace some of the practices of the vhavenda. these include complementarity, cooperation, inclusiveness, dialogue, and negotiation between men and women. In promoting equal participation between genders, this approach will help to overcome some of the barriers of participation seen elsewhere, especially unequal gender relations that cause gendered subordination.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>

05 Mar 2016 04:09:22 GMT

Display Next Eldis Biodiversity [eldis.org]

4th OECD Green Investment Financing Forum

The Forum (24-25 October 2017) will gather senior policy makers and key actors from around the world for lively, open and action-oriented discussions to advance the global green finance and investment agenda; and will address four main topics: from short-term actions to long-term ambition; opportunities for green investment; towards a sustainable financial system; and channels for green finance and investment.

Tue, 24 Oct 2017 16:22:00 GMT

The water challenge

Join us in a series of events in Stockholm World Water Week under the theme "Water and Waste: Reduce and Reuse" (27 August - 1 September) to discuss policies to manage water pollution, recent development in financing investment in water security, and further work on water governance.

Sun, 27 Aug 2017 19:52:00 GMT

Blogs and articles related to environment

Read what OECD bloggers have to say about topics as varied as air pollution, biodiversity, climate, environmental policies, green growth, investment, waste and water. Join the discussion on our latest blogs: The government role in mobilising investment and innovation in renewable energy and What’s holding back investment and innovation in renewable energy?

Mon, 07 Aug 2017 14:52:00 GMT

The Rising Cost of Ambient Air Pollution thus far in the 21st Century: Results from the BRIICS and the OECD Countries - Environment Working Paper

This paper presents updated results for the cost of ambient air pollution in 41 countries: the 6 major emerging economies known as the BRIICS – Brazil, Russia, India, Indonesia, China and South Africa – and the 35 OECD member countries.

Wed, 19 Jul 2017 09:07:00 GMT

OECD’s Gurría reaffirms need for global cooperation amid progress at G20 Summit

International cooperation is now more critical than ever, OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría said following a G20 Leader’s Summit marked both by controversy but also advances on a range of policies to tackle global challenges.

Sat, 08 Jul 2017 19:33:00 GMT

OECD biotechnology newsletter updates

OECD major events and activities relating to biotechnologies: latest developments are updated biannually in this Newsletter.

Wed, 28 Jun 2017 16:17:00 GMT

Green Talks Live: Investing in Climate, Investing in Growth

Watch the video - On 22 June 2017, OECD Environment Director Simon Upton presented key findings from the OECD report "Investing in Climate, Investing in Growth" during a Green Talks LIVE webinar. The report shows that integrating measures to tackle climate change into regular economic policy will have a positive impact on economic growth over the medium and long term.

Fri, 23 Jun 2017 15:28:00 GMT

Employment Implications of Green Growth - OECD report for the G7 Environment Ministers (June 2017)

OECD overview report on Employment Implications of Green Growth: Linking jobs, growth and green policies to the G7 Environment Ministers held on 11-12 June 2017 in Bologna.

Sun, 11 Jun 2017 19:30:00 GMT

Statement from OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría on the US decision to withdraw from the Paris Agreement on climate change

Climate change is a clear and undeniable challenge that requires a global response. The Paris Agreement represents the careful crafting of a collective effort of over 190 countries to meet this challenge.

Fri, 02 Jun 2017 19:10:00 GMT

Climate change and trade policy interactions: Implications of regionalism - Trade and Environment Working Paper

This report examines the implications of regional climate governance for international trade and conversely the implications of regional trade governance for climate change action. Regional approaches to climate change governance are discussed with a specific focus on the rise of “climate clubs” and their implications for international trade.

Wed, 31 May 2017 12:10:00 GMT

The Empirics of Enabling Investment and Innovation in Renewable Energy - Environment Working Paper

This paper undertakes econometric analysis to assess the impacts of climate mitigation policies and the quality of the investment environment on investment and innovation in renewable power in OECD and G20 countries. It also assesses how countries’ investment environments interact with climate mitigation policies to influence investment and patent activity in renewable power.

Wed, 31 May 2017 11:34:00 GMT

Taking action on climate change will boost economic growth

Integrating measures to tackle climate change into regular economic policy will have a positive impact on economic growth over the medium and long term, according to a new OECD report prepared in the context of the German Presidency of the G20.

Tue, 23 May 2017 09:00:00 GMT

Aid in Support of Environment

Statistics by sector and by country based on DAC Members’ reporting on the Environment Policy Marker.

Mon, 22 May 2017 18:23:00 GMT

Business brief: ENGIE: Enabling the energy transition

We usually speak of “the energy transition” or “the transition to a low-carbon economy.” But this expression comes short of the actual phenomenon. In fact, we are in the midst of an industrial revolution that is completely shaking up the energy industry and is bound to disrupt others as well, such as transportation.

Fri, 19 May 2017 16:39:00 GMT

Multi-objective local environmental simulator (MOLES 1.0): Model specification, algorithm design and policy applications - Environment Working Paper

This paper describes MOLES 1.0, an integrated land-use and transport model developed with Object-Oriented Programming principles in order to combine selected characteristics from Spatial Computable General Equilibrium and microsimulation models. MOLES 1.0 models the links between urban land use, mobility patterns, urban economic activities and their environmental impacts, in particular air pollution and emissions of greenhouse gases.

Thu, 04 May 2017 07:22:00 GMT

Display Next OECD Environment [oecd.org]

Rio+20: A voice from Sheffield, UK

Ruby Smith, 21, is a support planning co-ordinator for Sheffield Council, in Sheffield, UKRio+20 is a unique and historic opportunity for world leaders to prioritise development and plan a better world for future generations.I would like to ask delegates to remember the importance of putting...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Rio+20: A voice from Bosnia and Herzegovina

Seida Saric is country director for Women for Women International in Bosnia and HerzegovinaFoundations of any development rest on active and equal participation of both men and women in social, political and economic spheres of life. Women play a much more active role which, in turn, does not have...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Kalimantan Forests and Climate Partnership

This policy brief, produced by Care International, outlines a bilateral Reduced Emissions form Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) pilot project ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) Letter

This letter is written by the Executive Chair of Indonesia's National Council on Climate Change, Rachmat Witoelar; it outlines Indonesia's Nationally ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Readiness Preparation Proposals (R - PP)

This document was submitted to the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF), a World Bank programme that aims to assist developing countries with Reduced ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Asia-Pacific Regional Climate Change Adaptation Assessment

This report discusses the climate change adaptation needs of the Asia-Pacific region; it was undertaken in order to inform USAID's Regional Development ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Cities and Resilience

This policy brief highlights the key issues discussed at the Cities and Resilience Dialogue held in Bangkok, Thailand, in September 2009. The event assessed ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Kalimantan Forests and Climate Partnership

This policy brief, produced by Care International, outlines a bilateral Reduced Emissions form Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) pilot project ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) Letter

This letter is written by the Executive Chair of Indonesia's National Council on Climate Change, Rachmat Witoelar; it outlines Indonesia's Nationally ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Readiness Preparation Proposals (R - PP)

This document was submitted to the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF), a World Bank programme that aims to assist developing countries with Reduced ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Asia-Pacific Regional Climate Change Adaptation Assessment

This report discusses the climate change adaptation needs of the Asia-Pacific region; it was undertaken in order to inform USAID's Regional Development ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Asia-Pacific Regional Climate Change Adaptation Assessment

This report discusses the climate change adaptation needs of the Asia-Pacific region; it was undertaken in order to inform USAID's Regional Development ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

The doughnut can help Rio+20 see sustainable development in the round | Kate Raworth

Resource use has both an environmental ceiling and a social foundation, below which lies deprivation, but the doughnut-shaped space between the two demands our attentionIn 2009, Johan Rockström of the Stockholm Resilience Centre brought together some of the world's leading Earth-system scientists...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Rio+20 Earth summit: walkout at 'green economy' talks

Negotiators from developing countries insist wealthy nations must help fund their move to sustainable developmentEurope's financial crisis should not be used as an excuse for inaction and underfunding of moves towards a more sustainable global economy, a senior Brazilian diplomat warned at the...

2012-06-15T00:00:00-00:00

U.S. proposes tighter rules on soot pollution

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Obama administration proposed stricter standards to control harmful soot from heavy industry on Friday, a move expected to save lives but which drew criticism from Republicans and industry worried the costs of compliance will hurt the economy.

2012-06-15T00:00:00-00:00

Analysis: CO2 market has failed to promote cleaner energy

LONDON (Reuters) - Europe's emissions trading scheme has failed to create incentives for utilities to use cleaner energy fuels, meaning that governments will have to switch to simpler tools, such as subsidies and regulation, to enforce emissions reduction targets.

2012-06-15T00:00:00-00:00

Australia cuts number of firms to pay carbon tax

CANBERRA (Reuters) - Australia will levy a controversial carbon tax on about half the number of companies originally expected, a government list released on Friday shows, which may limit the economic and political impact of the tax which starts on July 1.

2012-06-15T00:00:00-00:00

Cities Bet They Can Curb Traffic With Games of Chance

To tackle congestion, clogged urban centers are testing the lure of prizes to persuade motorists to change their driving habits.

2012-06-15T00:00:00-00:00

Africa: Can Rio+20 Create a Climate of Change for Poor Communities?

[AlertNet]Climate change is often described in numbers - degrees of temperature rise, metric tonnes of carbon emissions. These numbers add up to devastating consequences: erratic rainfall, crop failure, hunger. But climate change also has a human face.

2012-06-15T00:00:00-00:00

Africa: Seizing the Opportunity for a Sustainable Future

[AlertNet]The 1992 Earth Summit was a bright moment for the environmental movement. For the first time, presidents and prime ministers - more than 100 in all - were "coming together to save the earth," as a headline on the cover of Time magazine put it.

2012-06-15T00:00:00-00:00

Display Next Earthwire Climate [earthwire.org]

World Business

Stock traders cheer on Bannon exit

White House adviser Steve Bannon, a right-wing nationalist, is leaving the White House.

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 18:22:33 GMT

US to review China intellectual property policies

China has voiced "serious concern" over the investigation, which could result in US trade sanctions.

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 23:13:43 GMT

Google's stance on neo-Nazis 'dangerous', says EFF

A digital rights group criticises action taken by Google, GoDaddy and Cloudflare against the Daily Stormer.

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 10:09:22 GMT

Visits to UK rise amid fall in pound

The numbers visiting from overseas increased by 7% in June but British residents' trips abroad also rose.

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 10:34:15 GMT

Trump scraps infrastructure council plan

The president is dropping plans for the business panel after ending two other advisory groups.

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 23:58:37 GMT

Infosys chief executive Vishal Sikka resigns

Vishal Sikka says the "continuous drumbeat of distractions" contributed to his decision to resign.

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 08:37:09 GMT

Wrestling bids to boost interest in China

Is it real or is it fake? The fans don't care in the US, and the WWE hopes they won't in China.

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 08:55:40 GMT

Kit Kat accused of copying Atari game Breakout

Nestle's marketing mimics the 1970s Atari computer game Breakout, a court case alleges.

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 10:01:45 GMT

Alibaba surges while Walmart stalls

Chinese e-commerce giant posts bumper profit but earnings are down for US big box retailer.

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 06:37:04 GMT

Daily Stormer: Cloudflare drops neo-Nazi site

Cloudflare no longer protects the Daily Stormer from distributed denial of service attacks.

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 10:32:30 GMT

Heineken-Punch Taverns pub deal cleared by CMA

The brewer avoids an in-depth investigation of its takeover of Punch by offering to sell off some pubs.

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 07:42:43 GMT

DIY firms Homebase and B&Q suffer sales slump

The UK's two biggest home improvement chains, B&Q and Homebase, have both reported a fall in sales.

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 16:17:19 GMT

BBC World News business headlines

The latest international business headlines from BBC World News.

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 16:10:29 GMT

How the microwave oven became a million dollar idea

The BBC's Aaron Heslehurst explains how the microwave oven became a million dollar idea.

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 00:05:36 GMT

Black ownership rules polarise S African mining sector

Will the South African government's attempt at redressing inequalities in the mining industry actually destroy it?

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 13:44:34 GMT

Display Next World Business from BBC News [bbc.co.uk/news]

Iran's proposed minister: missiles high on agenda

(MENAFN - Trend News Agency ) Tehran, Iran, August 18 By Mehdi Sepahvand ?- Trend: The nominee for the position of the minister of Defense has said that a robust missile progra...

Sat, 19 Aug 2017 01:59:54 GMT

Turkey's new military operation in Syria on agenda - PM

(MENAFN - Trend News Agency ) Baku, Azerbaijan, Aug. 18 By Rufiz Hafizoglu ? Trend: Turkey's new military operation in Syria, directed against terrorist organizations, has been...

Sat, 19 Aug 2017 01:59:50 GMT

Oman aims USD2bn investment in aquaculture ventures

(MENAFN) Oman's Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries is aiming several offers for boosting aquaculture ventures in the Sultanate, which would entail investment of USD2bn.Meanwhile...

Sat, 19 Aug 2017 01:54:40 GMT

Egypt-Sodic posts 88pct jump in H1 revenue

(MENAFN) Egypt-based Sodic, a pioneering real estate firm has recorded revenue of USD65.9mn for the first half of the year, an increase of 88 percent.Additionally, the strong perfo...

Sat, 19 Aug 2017 01:44:43 GMT

Listed insurance firms in UAE record USD208mn profit in H1

(MENAFN) Net profits of 28 insurance firms in Abu Dhabi Securities Exchange and Dubai Financial Market jumped 34.2 percent amid the first half of the year to USD208mn.Meanwhile, th...

Sat, 19 Aug 2017 01:25:48 GMT

Border opening for Haj welcome step, says FM

(MENAFN - Gulf Times) *Will respond positively to 'politically motivated' decision, says minister *A good step towards reducing tension: Ministry of Endowments and Islamic Affairs...

Sat, 19 Aug 2017 01:06:08 GMT

No Qatari mediation in Saudi Haj ban

(MENAFN - Gulf Times) Qatari sources have refuted Saudi Arabia's claims that the Saudi-Qatar land border was opened following a mediation led by Sheikh Abdullah bin Ali al-Thani. ...

Sat, 19 Aug 2017 01:06:08 GMT

Palestinian groups urge African nations to boycott Africa-Israel summit

(MENAFN - Gulf Times) A group of Palestinian activists, academics, and civil society organisations have launched a campaign to deter African nations from partaking in the upcoming ...

Sat, 19 Aug 2017 01:06:07 GMT

Emir sends message to Greek leader

(MENAFN - Gulf Times) His Highness the Emir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani yesterday sent a written message to the President of Greece, Prokopis Pavlopoulos, concerning bilateral ...

Sat, 19 Aug 2017 01:06:07 GMT

Bedaya launches 'prototype week' workshop

(MENAFN - Gulf Times) Bedaya Centre for Entrepreneurship and Career Development (Bedaya Centre), a joint initiative by Qatar Development Bank and Silatech, in collaboration with Qa...

Sat, 19 Aug 2017 01:06:06 GMT

Display Next MENAFN Regional Business [menafn.com]

An inclusive South Africa needs more investment and jobs

South Africa has made impressive social progress over the past two decades, lifting millions of people out of poverty and broadening access to essential services like water, electricity and sanitation.

Fri, 17 Jul 2015 13:00:00 GMT

Employment situation, first quarter 2015, OECD

OECD employment rate increases to 66.1% in first quarter of 2015

Thu, 16 Jul 2015 09:19:00 GMT

La OCDE establece la hoja de ruta para la adhesión de Costa Rica

La OCDE ha definido las pautas encaminadas a la adhesión de Costa Rica a la Organización, reforzando así su compromiso de dar cabida a nuevos países miembros.

Wed, 15 Jul 2015 15:00:00 GMT

OECD establishes roadmap for membership with Costa Rica

The OECD set out a clear path for Costa Rica’s accession to the Organisation, reinforcing the OECD’s commitment to further extend its global membership.

Wed, 15 Jul 2015 14:00:00 GMT

Countries should address disruptive effects of the digital economy

Countries are making increased efforts to develop their digital economies in a way that will maximise social and economic benefits, but now need to address the risk of disruption in areas like privacy and jobs, according to a new OECD report.

Wed, 15 Jul 2015 11:00:00 GMT

OECD holds three tax events in Addis to promote domestic resource mobilisation

The OECD is holding three tax events on the side-lines of the 3rd International Conference on Financing for Development in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Mon, 13 Jul 2015 21:01:00 GMT

Tax Inspectors Without Borders:OECD and UNDP to work with developing countries to make tax audits more effective

The OECD and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) have launched a new initiative to help developing countries bolster domestic revenues by strengthening their tax audit capacities.

Mon, 13 Jul 2015 11:00:00 GMT

OECD establishes roadmap for membership with Lithuania

The OECD set out a clear path for Lithuania’s accession to the Organisation, reinforcing the OECD’s commitment to further extend its global membership.

Fri, 10 Jul 2015 12:01:00 GMT

Jobs outlook improving slowly but millions risk being trapped at bottom of economic ladder

The jobs recovery is slowly gathering pace, but employment will remain well below pre-crisis levels in many countries, especially in Europe, through to the end of 2016, according to a new OECD report.

Thu, 09 Jul 2015 10:00:00 GMT

Composite Leading Indicators (CLI), OECD, July 2015

Composite leading indicators continue to point to growth convergence in most major economies

Wed, 08 Jul 2015 09:23:00 GMT

Canada could do more to help laid-off workers

Canada should improve the support its employment services offer to help laid-off workers find a new job more quickly, according to a new OECD report.

Tue, 07 Jul 2015 15:00:00 GMT

Slow growth in health spending but Europe lags behind

Many European countries saw further reductions in health spending in 2013, according to OECD Health Statistics 2015. Health spending continued to shrink in Greece, Italy and Portugal in 2013. Most countries in the European Union reported real per capita health spending below the levels of 2009. Outside of Europe, health spending has been growing at around 2.5% per year since 2010.

Tue, 07 Jul 2015 10:00:00 GMT

Relaunch productivity to boost growth and well-being

The slowdown in productivity over the past decade has added to concerns about the long-term economic outlook. But new OECD research shows that policy reforms can revive the diffusion of innovation and make better use of human talent to clear the path for higher and more inclusive productivity growth.

Mon, 06 Jul 2015 17:00:00 GMT

More effort needed on government integrity to help restore public trust

Countries need to do more to identify and reduce conflicts of interest and other breaches of integrity to help win back trust in national governments, which surveys suggest remains below pre-crisis levels, according to a new OECD report.

Mon, 06 Jul 2015 12:46:00 GMT

Contributions to GDP growth: first quarter 2015, Quarterly National Accounts, OECD

Private consumption, main driver of OECD GDP growth in the first quarter of 2015

Mon, 06 Jul 2015 09:35:00 GMT

Display Next OECD News [oecd.org]

Economic Development

Enthronisation of an ultra-presidential regime?

At first glance, everyday life seems not to have changed in Istanbul. The streets are congested; people hurry to the ferry or the bus. For weeks, there has been no terror attack. Nevertheless, there are some visible changes. There are much more policemen in the streets. In some days, the Istiklal Caddesi, the main shopping street on the European side, seems to be under a state of siege. At every street corner, there is police van with the blue light switched on.

Financing for development? Mostly not!

Recent disturbing trends in international finance have particularly problematic implications, especially for developing countries. The new United Nations report, World Economic Situation and Prospects 2017 (WESP 2017), is the only recent report of a multilateral inter-governmental organization to recognize these problems, especially as they are relevant to the financing requirements for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

The end of US hegemony

The Trump government signals unequivocally the end of international US hegemony. An international hegemon is able to define rules that find relatively broad acceptance internationally and plays a role in safeguarding international economic stability. The Trump government announced measures that go against the present economic rules while not proposing new ones.

Global employment crisis: 2030 Agenda under threat

The global deficit in quality jobs and deteriorating economic conditions in a number of regions threatens to undo decades of progress in poverty reduction, warns a new report by the International Labour Organization (ILO), the World Employment and Social Outlook (WESO) 2016.

The closing of democratic space for trade unions

Weakening of workers' rights in most regions is being aggravated by severe crackdowns on freedom of speech and assembly, according to the 2016 Global Rights Index. Restrictions on freedom of speech and assembly, including severe crackdowns in some countries, increased by 22%, with 50 out of 141 countries surveyed recording restrictions.

Agenda for transformation, solidarity, democracy

The year 2015 was marked on the one hand by the inability of the European Union (EU) to emerge from the crisis, and on the other by a dramatic rise in the number of people taking flight from their homes and from their homelands, because of wars and terrorist attacks, in many cases caused by the destructive policies of the EU and of its member states.

Global economy faces major headwinds in 2016

The world economy stumbled in 2015 and only a modest improvement is projected for 2016/17 as a number of cyclical and structural headwinds persist, says the United Nations World Economic Situation and Prospects (WESP) 2016 report. Global growth is estimated at a mere 2.4% in 2015.

The Latin American Left is losing ground

Within a few weeks leftwing governments in Latin America have experienced a breath-taking decline. The Latin American (centre-) left forces suffered several strategic defeats. They occurred in the biggest Latin American economies. First in Argentina, than in Venezuela, and also in Brazil the days of an uncontested majority of left forces are definitely over now.

The World Bank's new Gender Equality strategy

14 years after their previous strategy on gender mainstreaming, the WBG has decided to develop a new Gender Equality (GE) Strategy. This briefing document presents WIDE+ critical reflections and key recommendations to enhance the new World Bank Group's (WBG) strategy on Gender Equality.

Greece: Merkel's victory - a Pyrrhic victory?

The Euro Zone Summit on 12-13 July 2015 forced the Greek Syriza-led government into accepting practically all demands of the other euro zone states. In return, the Greek government received the prospect that negotiations on renewed credit programme might commence and the vague promise that longer grace and payment periods on the Greek debt might be considered.

Display Next WDEV World Economy & Development [wdev.eu]

India’s National Food Security Act (NFSA): Early Experiences

<p>In September 2013, the Parliament of India passed the National Food Security Act (NFSA) that made ‘right to food’ a legal entitlement for approximately three-quarters of the rural population and half of the urban population of India. Besides ensuring access to highly subsidised foodgrain, NFSA also made maternity benefits and nutrition for children aged six months to 14 years a legal entitlement. While it is too early to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the impact of NFSA, this paper attempts to document its rollout and to discuss important innovations and challenges emerging from NFSA’s early experiences in different states and union territories (UTs).</p>

29 Jun 2017 12:47:49 GMT

Use of simulation to examine a dairy goat breeding program in Tanzania

<p>This paper discusses selection in a dairy goat population for improved performance by conceptualizing it for a population in Tanzania. Seven strategies (5, 10, 20, 30, 50, 70, 100 test bucks) were simulated. A progeny test based selection breeding program fitting Mgeta (Morogoro, Tanzania) situation was optimized. The selection intensity, accuracy of prediction, and genetic gain of milk yield (kg) per day at heritability 0.1 and 0.2 are discussed. Use of natural mating for 1000 goats, in cooperating villages, were assumed. Three elite bucks were selected for breeding with 12% of the best females. Outlines of essential elements for a local sustainable dairy goat breeding program in Tanzania are included with a schematic figure showing selection steps for dairy goat breeding scheme fitting in Mgeta area. This study found that selection intensity gained when testing many bucks is more important for daily milk yield (DMY) (kg) genetic gain than the extra accuracy gained when testing fewer bucks. Mgeta has a mountainous terrain, small herd sizes per farmer and long distance from one cooperating village to another.<br /><br />Testing 30 bucks is practical for Mgeta. That gives relatively high (42% or 53%) accuracy of selection and genetic gain (2% or 2.6% for 0.1 or 0.2 heritability). The current results of estimated genetic gain are close to reported findings under other environments. Based on dairy goats of Norwegian breed in Tanzania, milked once daily, if 210 days of milking and an average of 1 litre milk yield is considered, the possible genetic gain per year in this program is equivalent to an increase of 4.2kg for 0.1 heritability and 5.5kg of milk per doe for 0.2 heritability of the trait. Such an increase in amount of milk due to a breeding program under the considered environment is promising. Collaborative efforts from farmers to consumers along the dairy goat market chain remain important elements to realize a sustainable high gain. The proposed breeding program may not be perfect in future because of practical options and accessibility to new knowledge. Thus, it becomes indispensable to revise breeding programs.</p>

29 Jun 2017 08:30:06 GMT

Climbing the inclusion ladder: artisanal gold mining in Tanzania

<p>Tanzania faces significant development challenges. While gross domestic product growth remains relatively impressive, many sectors are growing off a small base. Both the longevity of the acceleration and the quality of the growth are in question. Tanzania’s educational outcomes remain poor, and young people are less likely to find good quality employment. A fast-growing population requires an expansion of employment opportunities, and it is not clear that these are being created. A handful of companies provide the majority of tax revenue, rendering the government reliant on foreign aid in addition to taxation. President John Magufuli’s government therefore needs to broaden the tax base and diversify the economy without undermining current foreign exchange and tax earnings. Tanzania is endowed with extensive mineral resources (and recently discovered natural gas), which could mobilise resources for development, provided the sector is well governed. <br /><br />This paper examines the artisanal gold mining sector as an important employer and potential revenue generator. It also explores the negative social and environmental externalities associated with the sector. The barriers to entry for artisanal miners to formalise should be lowered, although this will not guarantee development. Most importantly, the government – in partnership with development organisations and the private sector – should roll out and ensure the uptake of inexpensive technologies (such as retorts) that will reduce negative externalities and increase potential positive economic spillover effects.</p>

22 Jun 2017 10:21:12 GMT

Young people’s gender role attitudes over the transition to adulthood in Egypt

<div>Change in gender role attitudes is a neglected dimension of research on the transition to adulthood in the Middle East and North Africa that has broad implications for young people’s outcomes, as well as attitudinal change in the region over time. Using a life course framework, the authors examine the reciprocal relationship between attitudes formation and two key transitions in young people’s lives: the transition to marriage and parenthood, and young women’s transition to labour force participation. In order to address the simultaneity of attitudes formation and transitions, the research exploits the panel dimension of the Survey of Young People in Egypt 2009 and 2014, estimating the impact of attitudes in 2009 on the likelihood of making transitions between 2009 and 2014, then the impact of those transitions on attitudes in 2014.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The authors find that young women with more egalitarian attitudes are more likely to enter the labour market but, contrary to most international literature, entering the labour market does not have a corresponding liberalising effect on women’s attitudes. Rather, entering the labour force leads to more conservative attitudes regarding the gender dynamics of household decision-making. This may reflect the challenges women face in balancing work and family, and suggests that women may compensate for working outside the home – which may be perceived as having a negative effect on their families – by developing more conservative attitudes regarding household dynamics. As in other contexts, the transition to marriage and parenthood is associated with increasing conservatism in young people’s attitudes.</div>

20 Jun 2017 12:53:59 GMT

The effect of mothers’ employment on youth gender role attitudes: evidence from Egypt

<p>Cross-nationally, having a working mother during childhood is associated with more egalitarian attitudes among both adult men and women. However, no previous studies have explored this relationship in the Middle East and North Africa, where women’s employment rates have remained persistently low. In this paper, the authors examine the impact of having a working mother during childhood on Egyptian young people’s attitudes towards women’s roles in the public sphere, gender roles in the household, and ideals around number of children and women’s age at marriage that are related to gender roles. In order to address the potential endogeneity of mother’s work and attitudes formation, the authors use an instrumental variable approach with panel data from the Survey of Young People in Egypt 2009 and 2014 waves. <br /><br />Mothers' employment is instrumented using the governorate-level female labour force participation rate and percentage of women working in the public sector in 2009. The paper finds that having a working mother during childhood led to significantly more egalitarian attitudes towards women’s roles in the public sphere among both young men and women. However, there was no effect on young people’s attitudes towards gender roles in the household. Having a working mother led to lower ideal number of children among sons, but did not have any effect on views of the ideal age of marriage for women among children of either gender. <br /><br />In the Egyptian context, having a working mother during childhood thus appears to led to more egalitarian attitudes around women’s roles outside the household but not necessarily their roles inside the household. This suggests that attitudes around gender roles in the household may be more strongly socially conditioned and thus less affected by individual experience, and is also consistent with the finding from labour market research that women continue to bear the brunt of housework and childcare in Egypt even when they are employed. Thus, while having an employed mother does have some liberalizing effect on individual attitudes, broader change in attitudes around gender roles both inside and outside the home may be needed in order to foster increased female labour force participation.</p>

20 Jun 2017 01:09:44 GMT

IBCIM economic corridor: facilitating sub-regional development

<div>The Bangladesh-China-India-Myanmar Forum for Regional Cooperation’s (BCIM) Economic Corridor (EC) initiative, a complex entanglement between security, economic and national interest, exemplifies Foreign Secretary Jaishankar's statement.</div><div><br />This paper attempts to analyse the economic aspect of this cooperation, focusing on the reasons for stalling of the BCIM EC’s progress, and explores measures to take the initiative forward. Despite all four countries having agreed to implement the EC in principle, admittedly, there has been a lull in its progress. The EC’s route has been put in place and is almost completely motorable. However, an analysis of the trade intensities and patterns among the four countries demonstrates that potential trade volumes are inadequat e to justify its implementation. Nonetheless, the EC continues to emphasise cooperation on the “Zone 3” pillars of Trade, Transport and Energy, which avoid addressing the existing realities of the BCIM countries’ underdevelopment.</div>

19 Jun 2017 12:42:24 GMT

Fighting BEPS in Africa: a review of Country-By-Country Reporting

<p>Following the Panama Papers leak and numerous press reports of aggressive tax planning by Multinational enterprises (MNEs) around the world, there has been a concerted effort, notably in developed countries, to combat MNE tax avoidance and increase international cooperation in tax matters. As MNEs operate across borders they can use multi-jurisdictional tax planning, in combination with transfer pricing, to limit their tax obligations. Unfortunately, some MNEs aggressively plan an operation around these tax structures to avoid paying their fair share of tax. This is mostly legal, as MNEs generally do not breach any single tax jurisdiction’s laws. However, such practices have a negative impact on the countries in which they are operating, regardless of whether they are legal or not.</p><p>A key responsive measure to address aggressive MNE tax planning has been the OECD/G20 Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (BEPS) Package. Its aim is to close loopholes between various national tax authorities that allow MNEs to unjustifiably shift profits across borders. Within this, a key component, and part of the minimum BEPS action requirements, is Action 13: Transfer Pricing Documentation and Country by Country Reporting (CbCR).</p><p>Policy recommendations made by this brief:</p><ul><li>by the time of the 2020 review MNEs will be more aware of this process, and it is possible that the idea of lowering the EUR 750 million revenue threshold will find a more receptive audience</li><li>given the trust barriers to lowering exchange of information requirements it is not clear that this issue can be resolved in favour of those African states currently not able to comply. Consequently, African countries need to upgrade their institutional capacities and legal frameworks. Official development assistance could be targeted at this area</li><li>as Action 13 reports are submitted over the next two years a much more informed assessment of the strengths and limitations of CbCR should emerge. This should enable the refinement, and possibly the extension, of the system </li><li>the application of CbCR to include other taxes paid by MNEs, beyond corporate income tax, could also be considered</li><li>the transparency of CbC reports will, no doubt, feature in the 2020 review and African revenue authorities will need to engage with the issue, as it could bridge a lot of their constraints</li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p>

19 Jun 2017 12:24:47 GMT

Trade in high technology products trends and policy imperatives for BRICS

<p>The rise and relevance of BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) cannot be overstated. BRICS constitutes&nbsp; the&nbsp; most&nbsp; prominent&nbsp; emerging economies with substantial influence on world affairs – both political and economic. While China has demonstrated its capacity to be the world leader in production and trade, India and Brazil have been steady on rapid income growth and technological development backed by mature institutions and policy environment that tend to be oriented towards long-term economic development. BRICS&nbsp; has&nbsp; become&nbsp; the fastest and largest emerging market economy.<br /><br />This&nbsp; paper&nbsp; examines&nbsp; the&nbsp; emerging&nbsp; strength&nbsp; of&nbsp; BRICS&nbsp; in&nbsp; high-technology trade. We reviewed trends in high-technology trade primarily in BICS (excluding Russia). Given that China and India are leading exporters of High-tech products (HTPs) among BICS, changing patterns of intra-industry trade&nbsp; have&nbsp; been&nbsp; analysed&nbsp; at&nbsp; the&nbsp; disaggregated&nbsp; level&nbsp; for&nbsp; these&nbsp; countries. Trade denomination of Information Technology Products has been analysed as&nbsp; a&nbsp; special&nbsp; case&nbsp; to&nbsp; understand&nbsp; roles&nbsp; played&nbsp; by&nbsp; global&nbsp; trade&nbsp; agreements&nbsp; in influencing production and trade of high-technology goods. BRICS has also made significant progress in technology intensive trade in agriculture which is rarely captured in the analyses based on HTPs. The paper concludes with reflection on BRICS cooperation in global technology and trade governance for long term capacity building, industrial development and competitiveness.</p>

19 Jun 2017 11:59:32 GMT

The interface between access and benefit-sharing and biotrade in Namibia: exploring potential areas of synergy

<div>Legal uncertainty and administrative and regularity burdens are serious impediments to sustainable and responsible biodiversity-based economic activities. With the entry into force of the Nagoya Protocol on Access to Genetic Resources and the Fair and Equitable Sharing of Benefits Arising from their Utilisation (Nagoya Protocol) an opportunity has arisen for countries to design an access and benefit-sharing (ABS) framework. This can promote the commercialisation of biological resources (biotrade) and provide legal certainty and transparency for the transfer of genetic resources. Although most biotrade businesses follow the core principles of sustainable biodiversity, there is lack of clarity about the application of ABS policy frameworks on biotrade businesses. The Nagoya Protocol aims to clarify key concepts, define the scope of ABS, and stipulate the responsibilities of user and provider countries of genetic resources. As a party to the protocol, Namibia has started developing comprehensive ABS legislation by leveraging its existing administrative and regulatory frameworks.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The challenge for Namibia is to find a mutually supportive interrelation between ABS and biotrade, where the implementation of ABS and the promotion of biotrade can go hand in hand. Experiences in other African countries illustrate that the implementation of ABS frameworks is not without its challenges. In South Africa, broader economic losses and further marginalisation of women and poor communities occurred when ABS regulations were applied to existing biotrade businesses. In order to avoid these kinds of unanticipated consequences, Namibia’s efforts to develop ABS legislation and set up institutional arrangements to support the implementation of the Nagoya Protocol require careful policy consideration. A significant step in the right direction is to understand the interface between biotrade and ABS, especially the positive interaction that should exist between the two, and to have an informed strategy that addresses this complex relationship.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>It is the objective of this exploratory study to offer an outline of the national policy context, the ABS development process and salient issues and the connections between biotrade and ABS in the era of the Convention on Biological Diversity and the Nagoya Protocol.</div>

19 Jun 2017 11:38:04 GMT

Value chain analysis in India to identify nutrition-sensitive interventions for improved maternal diets in India

<p>Micronutrient insufficiencies are a serious public health problem among women of reproductive age in Low and Middle Income Countries including India, adversely affecting maternal health and economic productivity, and child growth and educational outcomes. Fruit and vegetables are important sources of micronutrients and consumption of these foods is lower than recommendations. Value chain analysis involves understanding how actors (farmers/ producers, wholesalers and vendors) make decisions about what produce they grow and sell. It can be employed to improve nutrition by identifying constraints to the supply and demand of healthful foods and developing interventions to address these constraints.</p><p>The University of Southampton undertook a study titled Identifying nutrition-sensitive interventions to improve maternal diet quality in rural Indian settings using value chain analysis supported by the Leveraging Agriculture for Nutrition in South Asia (LANSA) consortium awarded from the Call for Proposals under LANSA’s first Responsive Window opportunity. The study aims to develop an interdisciplinary framework linking value chain activities to nutrition in rural Maharashtra.</p><p>Recommendations for future action:<br /><br />The findings of this research are qualitative and hypothesis generating. In order to prioritise interventions, quantitative survey data would be useful. Recommendations for future research and interventions is to reduce supply and demand constraints. Some <br />suggestions for future interventions are:</p><ul><li>changing perceptions of indigenous vegetables</li><li>more equitable division of food and workload within the household</li><li>increased awareness of the importance of including fruits and vegetables in daily diet through information, education and communication material shared in schools, Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS), Self-Help Groups and community-based organisations</li><li>support for vendors to sell locally</li><li>re-distribution of risk within the value chain</li><li>initiatives to increase awareness and effective implementation of insurance for farmers against crop failures at block and panchayat levels</li><li>improved storage infrastructure to improve shelf-life</li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p>

19 Jun 2017 03:37:09 GMT

Securing Nairobi's poor neighbourhoods policy considerations for enhancing community participation

<div>Kenya has grappled with extensive crime and insecurity, ranging from armed robberies, carjacking and street crime, to politically-motivated, ethnically-organised violence, resource conflicts and terror attacks that affect both rural and urban areas. Poor urban neighbourhoods have in particular continued to face serious challenges of crime and insecurity.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><div>As is the case in a number of countries in Africa, public policing in Kenya has not succeeded in complete assertion of state monopoly on violence. Poor infrastructure, inadequate financial resources and deficiency in security personnel numbers are among the key factors that limit state capacity to police the entire terrain of the country.</div></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><div>This policy brief suggests a policy trajectory that draws lessons from the assessment of&nbsp; community-led security mechanisms in Mlango Kubwa in Mathare sub-county and Kawangware, in Dagoretti North sub-county of Nairobi. In an age when policing and security provision has seen the emergence of a range of hybrid measures and joint ventures between the state security agencies and civilians, a fresh policy look at security governance from the lessons at the community level is important.</div></div>

19 Jun 2017 02:28:30 GMT

Mitigating electoral conflict in Kenya’s 2017 General Election

<div>On 8 August 2017 Kenya is expected to conduct a general election in which new representatives at the county and national levels will be elected. This election is likely to be one of the most competitive at the local level yet.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><div>This policy brief analyses the challenge of ensuring peaceful 2017 general election in Kenya and makes recommendations to mitigate the risks posed by the polls. It does this through an examination of the 2017 electoral landscape through the lenses of political and socio economic context. Further, it examines the institutions that will handle 2017 elections and the extent to which they are suited to delivering a peaceful and credible election.<br /><br /></div><div>In addition, it assesses the degree to which previous efforts to address the challenge of electoral violence in Kenya, especially those employed in 2013, have contributed to mitigating and resolving violent conflicts. Finally, the brief offers policy recommendations for the various stakeholders towards a credible and peaceful election in 2017.</div></div>

19 Jun 2017 01:52:59 GMT

Africa’s youth employment challenge: new perspectives | IDS Bulletin Vol 48, No 3

<p>Youth and employment concepts are not new to development discourse in sub-Saharan Africa but over the last decade interest has increased dramatically, becoming a much more important focus for policy, intervention and research throughout the continent (and globally).</p><p>This&nbsp;IDS Bulletin&nbsp;reflects challenges in Africa and demonstrates how political context shapes youth-related policy.The articles in the Bulletin consider the evidence on youth employment policy and interventions, the politics of youth policy, the changing nature of young people’s work, and the promotion of entrepreneurship. They are authored by the ten members of the first cohort of the Matasa Fellows Network (a joint initiative by the MasterCard Foundation and IDS), which has a particular focus on the youth employment challenge in Africa.</p><p>Articles:</p><ul><li>Introduction: New Perspectives on Africa’s Youth Employment Challenge: Seife Ayele, Samir Khan and James Sumberg</li><li>Youth Employment in Developing Economies: Evidence on Policies and Interventions: Nicholas Kilimani</li><li>The Politics of Youth Employment and Policy Processes in Ethiopia: Eyob Balcha Gebremariam</li><li>The Side-Hustle: Diversified Livelihoods of Kenyan Educated Young Farmers: Grace Muthoni Mwaura</li><li>Gambling, Dancing, Sex Work: Notions of Youth Employment in Uganda: Victoria Flavia Namuggala</li><li>Navigating Precarious Employment: Social Networks Among Migrant Youth in Ghana: Thomas Yeboah</li><li>Youth Participation in Smallholder Livestock Production and Marketing: Edna Mutua, Salome Bukachi, Bernard Bett, Benson Estambale and Isaac Nyamongo</li><li>Non-Farm Enterprises and the Rural Youth Employment Challenge in Ghana: Monica Lambon-Quayefio</li><li>Does Kenya’s Youth Enterprise Development Fund Serve Young People?: Maurice Sikenyi</li><li>Promoting Youth Entrepreneurship: The Role of Mentoring: Ayodele Ibrahim Shittu</li><li>Programme-Induced Entrepreneurship and Young People’s Aspirations: Jacqueline Halima Mgumia</li></ul><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p>

16 Jun 2017 12:12:13 GMT

Linked Open Data: The Essentials. The climate knowledge brokering edition

<p><span style="color: #3a3a3a; font-family: Quattrocento, serif; font-size: 16px;">This &nbsp;new edition of REEEP’s highly successful manual Linked Open Data: The Essentials offers a solid introduction to Linked Open Data (LOD) principles, with new case studies and updated information on how to make the most of the possibilities LOD has to offer. The manual is particularly targeted at knowledge brokers working in the climte change sector, with most of the examples and case studies focused on this area, but the general principles are broadly applicable to other disciplines and sectors.</span></p>

16 Jun 2017 03:55:20 GMT

Explaining South African xenophobia

<div>After widespread violence in 2008 and 2015, South Africa is now clearly one of most hostile destinations in the world for African migrants. Existing research on the determinants of South African xenophobia has focused on developing and advancing theories, with little attention paid to testing which theories, if any, actually account for mass xenophobia.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>By combining individual-level Afrobarometer survey items with municipal-level census indicators, this paper produces a rich, quantitative data set of numerous factors that have been proposed as determinants of South African xenophobia. The results of multilevel regression analyses show support for the explanations of poverty, relative deprivation, frustration with government, and social mobilization, with mixed evidence for resource competition. Taken together, the results point toward a mechanism of scapegoating, where frustrations and hopelessness produce aggression that is targeted at African immigrants</div>

16 Jun 2017 03:14:35 GMT

Display Next Eldis Development News [eldis.org]

Countries are progressing too slowly on green growth

Many countries have become more efficient in using natural resources and the services provided by the environment, generating more economic output per unit of carbon emitted and of energy or raw materials consumed. Yet progress is too slow, and if emissions embodied in international trade are included, advances in environmental productivity are more modest, a new OECD report shows.

Tue, 20 Jun 2017 10:17:00 GMT

New energy in the electricity sector

With new business models emerging, competition in the electricity sector is beginning to stir. This article by the OECD's Chris Pike looks at how the rise of the digital economy has led numerous markets to experience radical innovation in business models.

Tue, 13 Jun 2017 19:57:00 GMT

The Empirics of Enabling Investment and Innovation in Renewable Energy - Environment Working Paper

This paper undertakes econometric analysis to assess the impacts of climate mitigation policies and the quality of the investment environment on investment and innovation in renewable power in OECD and G20 countries. It also assesses how countries’ investment environments interact with climate mitigation policies to influence investment and patent activity in renewable power.

Wed, 31 May 2017 11:34:00 GMT

Blogs and articles related to environment

Read what OECD bloggers have to say about topics as varied as air pollution, biodiversity, climate, environmental policies, green growth, investment, waste and water. Join the discussion on our latest blog: Climate - Towards a just transition, with no stranded workers and no stranded communities.

Tue, 23 May 2017 10:37:00 GMT

Taking action on climate change will boost economic growth

Integrating measures to tackle climate change into regular economic policy will have a positive impact on economic growth over the medium and long term, according to a new OECD report prepared in the context of the German Presidency of the G20.

Tue, 23 May 2017 09:00:00 GMT

We need leaders to act in service of future generations

More than any other leader in modern history, Nelson Mandela understood that a society must bridge divides and work together to thrive. He also firmly believed that we must strive to leave our children with a safer, more peaceful and more prosperous world than the one we inherited. He said that “there can be no keener revelation of a society’s soul than the way in which it treats its children”.

Thu, 11 May 2017 14:16:00 GMT

Raising revenues through carbon pricing can help improve energy affordability

This report uses household level data covering 20 OECD countries to analyse energy affordability at current energy prices and explores how these indicators change in response to a simulated energy tax reform. The report finds that higher energy prices, needed to cut harmful carbon emissions and air pollution, can also help achieve social policy objectives.

Thu, 11 May 2017 11:00:00 GMT

Korea needs to put green growth vision into action

Korea has improved access to environmental services and become a world leader in climate change mitigation technology.

Thu, 16 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Estonia should reduce its oil shale reliance for greener growth

Estonia needs to move faster to reduce its dependence on oil shale so it can advance towards a greener economy and reduce air pollution and waste generation, according to a new OECD report.

Wed, 01 Mar 2017 11:00:00 GMT

Green investment banks

To leverage the impact of relatively limited public resources, over a dozen national and sub-national governments have created public green investment banks (GIBs) and GIB-like entities.

Tue, 31 Jan 2017 11:23:00 GMT

Call for Papers: Fifth Green Growth Knowledge Platform (GGKP) Annual Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure

The Fifth GGKP Annual Conference will be hosted by the World Bank on the topic of sustainable infrastructure, to stimulate research on these issues and foster interdisciplinary dialogue where relevant.The scientific committee therefore calls for contributions on any aspect of the infrastructure agenda, particularly for developing countries, with a focus on sustainability. Deadline for preliminary versions by 15 June 2017.

Fri, 20 Jan 2017 11:06:00 GMT

OECD Green Growth Newsletter

Read our latest December edition and all previous issues of the newsletter. The December issue draws your attention to the OECD work on Mainstreaming Biodiversity, highlights recent Green Growth news such as the launch of GGKP’s BIG-E Database and Georgia’s adherence to the OECD Green Growth Declaration. It also highlights the OECD’s most recent publications.

Thu, 15 Dec 2016 16:18:00 GMT

Increased investment in renewable energy is key to spur sustainable growth in Emerging Asia

Despite a challenging global environment, the growth prospects of Emerging Asia (Southeast Asia, China and India) remain robust over the medium term, according to the latest edition of the OECD Development Centre’s Economic Outlook for Southeast Asia, China and India.

Thu, 15 Dec 2016 09:00:00 GMT

Georgia adheres to the OECD Declaration on Green Growth

There are now 45 Adherents to the 2009 OECD Declaration on Green Growth. Georgia has joined Costa Rica, Colombia, Croatia, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Morocco, Peru, Tunisia, as well as OECD members in having adhered to the Declaration.

Thu, 24 Nov 2016 15:58:00 GMT

Green Growth and Sustainable Development Forum 2016

This year's Green Growth and Sustainable Development Forum (GGSD Forum) focuses on the theme “Urban green growth, spatial planning and land-use”. Land use and spatial planning policies have implications for both the environment and the economy. Overall, consideration will be given to the potential for regional, rural and urban policy to contribute to green growth.

Wed, 09 Nov 2016 11:32:00 GMT

Display Next OECD Sustainable Development [oecd.org]

OECD’s Gurría reaffirms need for global cooperation amid progress at G20 Summit

International cooperation is now more critical than ever, OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría said following a G20 Leader’s Summit marked both by controversy but also advances on a range of policies to tackle global challenges.

Sat, 08 Jul 2017 19:33:00 GMT

Monitoring investment and trade measures

G20 Leaders are firmly committed to open trade and investment and to resisting protectionism in all its forms. They have mandated WTO, OECD and UNCTAD – the leading international organisations in the area of international trade and investment policies – to monitor policy developments and report publicly on these commitments.

Fri, 30 Jun 2017 07:58:00 GMT

The politics of globalisation circa 1773

Newness in politics has a long and eventful history. Globalisation and the battle for and against are no exception, as the events of the late 18th century show.

Fri, 09 Jun 2017 11:47:00 GMT

Reform services trade policies to boost the global economy, OECD says

Better services trade policy can stimulate inclusive economic growth by promoting access to the information, skills, technology, funding and markets needed for success in an increasingly digital global economy, according to a new OECD report.

Thu, 08 Jun 2017 14:52:00 GMT

Better but not good enough: New approaches are needed to make globalisation work for all, OECD says in latest Economic Outlook

The global economy is expected to pick up moderately but greater efforts are needed to ensure that the benefits from growth and globalisation are more widely shared, according to the OECD’s latest Economic Outlook.

Wed, 07 Jun 2017 15:33:00 GMT

International trade statistics: trends in first quarter 2017

G20 merchandise trade growth accelerates in Q1 2017

Mon, 29 May 2017 17:19:00 GMT

Making Trade Work for All

Against the background of rising anti-globalisation sentiment, Making Trade Work for All argues that while there are good reasons for some people to be angry, trade is not the root of many problems, nor can it solve them on its own. The paper proposes that what is needed is an integrated approach across domestic, trade and international policies to make the whole system work better for more people.

Thu, 18 May 2017 08:00:00 GMT

International trade consequences of climate change - Trade and Environment Working Paper

This report provides an analysis of how climate change damages may affect international trade in the coming decades and how international trade can help limit the costs of climate change. It analyses the impacts of climate change on trade considering both direct effects on infrastructure and transport routes and the indirect economic impacts resulting from changes in endowments and production.

Tue, 02 May 2017 10:28:00 GMT

OECD's Gurría signals sharper focus on fixing globalisation to make it work for all

OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría today stressed the OECD’s commitment to help governments better address the negative consequences of globalisation while preserving the benefits of open economies and societies worldwide.

Thu, 27 Apr 2017 15:00:00 GMT

The Bill Frenzel Champion of Free Trade Award – Economic Club of Minnesota

The OECD Secretary-General spoke to the Economic Club of Minnesota about what must be done to make the trade system that has benefited so many work for everyone.

Wed, 19 Apr 2017 02:00:00 GMT

Towards a Better Globalisation: How Germany can respond to the critics

Citizens in many countries are expressing dissatisfaction with how they believe trade, technology and immigration are affecting their daily lives. While much of this discontent can be traced back to the global economic crisis, its root causes are more complex. What can be done at the Global, European and German level?

Tue, 11 Apr 2017 11:40:00 GMT

One in five mobile phones shipped abroad is fake

Nearly one in five mobile phones and one in four video game consoles shipped internationally is fake, as a growing trade in counterfeit IT and communications hardware weighs on consumers, manufacturers and public finances, according to a new OECD report.

Tue, 28 Mar 2017 16:00:00 GMT

International trade statistics: trends in fourth quarter 2016

G20 merchandise trade growth picks up in Q4 2016

Tue, 28 Feb 2017 16:28:00 GMT

Forthcoming release of new Trade in Value-Added (TiVA) data in 2017/2018

In Q1 2017 there will be a "light" update of the TiVA/ICIO introducing two new countries, Morocco and Peru and in Q1 2018 a "major" update will occur.

Tue, 20 Dec 2016 15:05:00 GMT

International trade statistics: trends in third quarter 2016

G20 merchandise trade growth remains sluggish in Q3 2016

Tue, 29 Nov 2016 17:25:00 GMT

Display Next OECD Trade [oecd.org]

Employment

IS Technical Implementation Manager (FIN0306)

<p>Are you an experienced technical implementation manager looking for a career challenge?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Do you have project implementation experience within an Information Systems environment?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>If so, we would like to hear from you.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>We are looking for an experienced technical implementation manager to lead the roll-out of a critical service improvement project to all Oxfam GB staff.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In this position, you will manage the service improvement project where your previous experience in delivering a large scale application roll-out and email replacement in short, time-frames will make a difference in our organisation. You&nbsp;will also understand the challenges of working in a busy, pressured IT environment and will bring the necessary skills to lead the project and get&nbsp;together colleagues to deliver with minimal impact to users.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This is an crucial&nbsp;role in the service delivery team and an excellent opportunity to lead a critical, fast paced implementation of new services. The Information Systems (IS) Department enables 5,000 colleagues and 22,000 volunteers in 60+ countries to work 365 days a year to deliver Oxfam&rsquo;s mission of a just world without poverty.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Skills, Experience and Knowledge</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Essential</strong></p> <ul> <li>Demonstrable project implementation experience in an IS environment</li> <li>Excellent planning and communication skills, with attention to detail</li> <li>Ability to influence stakeholders across all levels of the business</li> <li>Effective relationship management skills</li> <li>Proven time management skills- able to handle conflicting priorities and juggle multiple workstreams</li> <li>Strong problem solving and exceptional decision-making ability</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Desirable</strong></p> <ul> <li>Certification in / demonstrable experience of ITIL V3</li> <li>Experience implementing O365 and Windows 10 to a large user base based in the UK and international (remote) offices</li> <li>Working knowledge of PC and Mac-based environments</li> <li>Education to degree level in a computing related (or course with a major computing element) subject</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>We are commuted to ensuring diversity and gender equality in our organisation</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>For a full job profile please download the following :&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>

Wed, 28 Jun 2017 15:52:22 GMT

Country Programme Coordinator

<p class="Heading41"><strong>Location</strong></p> <p>Geneva, Switzerland, with regular travel</p> <p class="Heading41"><strong>Duration</strong></p> <p>Initially from August 2017 to December 2018</p> <p class="Heading41"><strong>Full/part time</strong></p> <p>60% to 100% of full time <br /> <em>starting at 60% of full-time, the position may evolve to a full time in the course of the contract, based on operational needs and the availability of funds.</em></p> <p class="Heading41"><strong>Closing date for applications</strong></p> <p>12<sup>th</sup> July 2017</p> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p class="Heading41"><strong>Context</strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The Country Programme Coordinator is a new function within the GICHD that will play an essential role in the organisation-wide project piloting a country programme approach. Under the Director of Operations and in coordination with the Heads of Divisions and the Results-based Management Systems Advisor, the Country Programme Coordinator will test this approach for one of our partner countries and contribute to its further development. Operating within the existing Results-based Management Systems (RBM), s/he will provide overall programming coherence, coordination and results-based management for the GICHD package of support interventions in this country, according to the jointly identified programme outcomes (see &bdquo;<a href="https://www.gichd.org/fileadmin/GICHD-resources/rec-documents/GICHD-Brochure-2016.pdf">What we do</a>&ldquo;). S/he will ensure sound budget follow-up and financial management of the country programme and foster the coordination between several GICHD divisions participating in the programme. The Country Programme Coordinator will also ensure that lessons learnt are effectively shared within the GICHD, incorporated into the on-going implementation of activities and integrated into the monitoring of the country programme objectives.</p> <p class="Heading41" style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p class="Heading41"><strong>Responsibilities</strong></p> <p><em>Design and resource mobilization</em></p> <ul> <li style="text-align: justify;">Design, plan, manage and monitor the country programme, consisting of a coherent country support package, and the related financial resources, in accordance with the established RBM and financial processes and tools.</li> <li style="text-align: justify;">In liaison with the RBM Systems Advisor, ensure that the country programme is based on a Theory of Change developed in collaboration with national partners.</li> <li style="text-align: justify;">Compile the country programme into donor proposals; through Donor Coordinators, follow up on donor proposals submission and contracting and ensure acceptance and close-out of programme with the relevant donors.</li> <li style="text-align: justify;">Mainstream gender and diversity inclusive considerations at all stages of the programme.</li> <li style="text-align: justify;">Liaise with the Support and Administration Division to incorporate country-specific financial plans into the internal financial control systems.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Implementation and resource management</em></p> <ul> <li style="text-align: justify;">Liaise regularly with the country(ies)&rsquo; national authorities and get acquainted with the governing and managing bodies of these authorities.</li> <li style="text-align: justify;">Act as the &ldquo;Country Focal Point&rdquo; for the country(ies) in his/her portfolio. Organise and coordinate the interventions of a GICHD country team.</li> <li style="text-align: justify;">Coordinate with Heads of Divisions to ensure availability of staff and funding resources.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Monitoring and reporting</em></p> <ul> <li style="text-align: justify;">In liaison with the RBM Systems Advisor, design a monitoring and evaluation process for the country programme.</li> <li style="text-align: justify;">Monitor the delivery of the country programme and highlight any problems or difficulties to relevant managers (Director of Operations or Heads of Divisions) through regular reporting.&nbsp;</li> <li style="text-align: justify;">Liaise with relevant colleagues and national partners to report on programme progress and compile country progress reports regularly.</li> <li style="text-align: justify;">Coordinate with relevant managers (Director of Operations and Heads of Divisions) to implement corrective action when budget deviations, deliverable quality or deliverable delays fall out of agreed acceptance margins.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Evaluation</em></p> <ul> <li style="text-align: justify;">Ensure that regular country programme evaluations are carried out and the lessons learnt contribute to the steering of this pilot project and to the GICHD&rsquo;s overall learning and development.</li> </ul> <p class="Heading41"><strong>Profile requirements</strong></p> <p class="Citation1">Essential requirements</p> <ul> <li style="text-align: justify;">Several years international experience as project and/or programme manager, in the nexus of&nbsp; humanitarian affairs, development cooperation, disarmament, post-conflict recovery and reconstruction or other relevant field</li> <li style="text-align: justify;">Administration, monitoring and reporting of donor funds, multi-year budgets and programme finances</li> <li style="text-align: justify;">Ability to plan and coordinate, in a matrix organization, the human resources contributing to the project/programme</li> <li style="text-align: justify;">Ability to communicate clearly and constructively with a wide range of stakeholders from diverse social, cultural, economic and educational backgrounds</li> <li style="text-align: justify;">Commitment to the continuous improvement of individual and organisation-wide results</li> <li style="text-align: justify;">Understanding and experience in mainstreaming gender and diversity topics throughout programmes and services</li> <li style="text-align: justify;">Languages: excellent verbal and written English; fluency in verbal and written Spanish</li> <li style="text-align: justify;">Availability to travel occasionally and operate in potentially unstable regions</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p class="Citation1">Desirable characteristics:</p> <ul> <li style="text-align: justify;">Expertise in Results-based Design, Monitoring &amp; Evaluation</li> <li style="text-align: justify;">Exposure to Mine Action</li> <li style="text-align: justify;">A post-graduate degree, diploma or equivalent vocational qualification in a relevant field of study</li> <li style="text-align: justify;">Working knowledge of French, Arabic, Russian, Portuguese or another language practiced in mine-ERW affected countries</li> </ul> <p>The incumbent will be recruited locally and will not be eligible to any international relocation benefit.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p class="Heading41"><strong>Applications</strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">To apply please follow this link <a href="https://neospheres.csod.com/ats/careersite/jobdetails.aspx?site=30&amp;c=neospheres&amp;id=935&amp;source=eldis">GICHD Job Application Portal</a> and submit your candidacy through the online platform. Your application must be presented in English and include a CV of maximum 5 pages, a letter of motivation, your earliest date of availability and any other additional material you wish to present in support of your candidacy.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>The GICHD implements a </em><a href="http://www.gichd.org/fileadmin/GICHD/topics/gender-diversity/GICHD-Gender-and-Diversity-Policy-2013.pdf"><em>Gender and Diversity policy</em></a><em> and is an equal opportunities employer. Applications are encouraged from women and men, nationals of mine-affected countries and individuals with a disability or special needs, who meet the above profile requirements.</em></p> <p class="Heading41"><strong>About us</strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">In a world where human security is still hindered by explosive hazards, the Geneva International Centre for Humanitarian Demining (GICHD) works to eliminate mines, cluster munitions and other explosive remnants of war. To achieve this, the GICHD supports national authorities, international organisations and civil society in their efforts to improve the relevance and performance of mine action. Core activities include furthering knowledge, promoting norms and standards, and developing in-country and international capacity. This support covers all aspects of mine action: strategic, managerial, operational and institutional. The GICHD works for mine action that is not an end in itself but contributes to the broader objective of human security &ndash; freedom from fear and freedom from want. This effort is facilitated by the GICHD's location within the Maison de la Paix in Geneva.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>GICHD website <a href="http://www.gichd.org/">www.gichd.org</a></p> <p>Follow us on <a href="https://twitter.com/theGICHD">Twitter</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/gichd">Facebook</a>, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/GICHD1">Youtube</a> and <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/company/gichd/">LinkedIn</a></p> <p>For further information please contact us at <a href="mailto:hr@gichd.org">hr@gichd.org</a></p>

Wed, 28 Jun 2017 09:19:14 GMT

Coordinator, Inclusive Professional Development and Partnerships

<p><strong>Coordinator, Inclusive Professional Development and Partnerships </strong></p> <ul> <li>Coordinator role with the long standing Australia Awards program</li> <li>6 month contract, part time 2 days per week</li> <li>Start date as soon as possible</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Port Moresby based, Non-ARF role</li> </ul> <p class="CONLevel11"><strong>The Program</strong></p> <p>Australia Awards &ndash; Papua New Guinea is designed to promote knowledge, leadership and enduring ties between Australia and PNG. It aims to build knowledge and skills to address PNG&rsquo;s economic and development challenges through international scholarships to Australia, and the provision of in-PNG scholarships.&nbsp;</p> <p>It offers the next generation of leaders in Papua New Guinea opportunities to acquire professional and technical knowledge and skills relevant to the priorities of the Government of PNG. The program fosters people-to-people links between Australia and PNG and ensures opportunities are provided for women, people with disabilities and people from remote locations. The Awards program focuses on supporting alumni to use their skills, knowledge and networks to drive change and innovation.</p> <p>Australia Awards &ndash; PNG includes three study options:</p> <ul> <li>Australia Award Scholarships for Papua New Guineans to study primarily postgraduate courses in Australia;</li> <li>Australia Awards Fellowships &ndash; Papua New Guinea (short courses) for Papua New Guineans to undertake study in Australia, receiving an Australian qualification; and</li> <li>Australia Awards Pacific Scholarships for Papua New Guineans to study in PNG to meet critical workforce gaps.&nbsp;</li> </ul> <p>To deliver Australia Awards outcomes, there are four streams: Australia Awards; PNG and Pacific Awards; Outreach and Alumni; and Professional Development and Partnerships. Australia Awards &ndash; PNG is managed by Coffey, a Tetra Tech company, on behalf of the Australian Government.</p> <p class="CONLevel11"><strong>The Position</strong></p> <p>Reporting to the Manager, Professional Development and Partnerships, the Coordinator will support the implementation and monitoring of inclusive professional development and partnerships activities in line with DFAT guidelines and the objectives of Australia Awards PNG (AAPNG), including reintegration approaches for returning awardees living with a disability.</p> <p class="CONLevel11"><strong>The Person</strong></p> <p>The ideal candidate will have an undergraduate degree in an appropriate field of study, or relevant work experience and a knowledge of the Australian Higher Education Sector. For success in this role candidates will need to have a strong understanding of the disability sector, including the rights of and barriers faced by people with a disability. Experience in Human Resources Development, Education or Project Coordination in international development context is required.</p> <p>Candidates will have demonstrated experience in working in a small team, have high level inter-personal and communication skills, stakeholder management skills combined with a knowledge of the Government of Papua New Guinea, its structure and reform agenda as well as policies and systems that relate to Human Resources and Training.</p> <p class="CONLevel11"><strong>How to apply:</strong></p> <p>People living with a disability are strongly encouraged to apply. This is a Papua New Guinea non-ARF position based in Port Moresby. Remuneration is competitive but does not include a housing allowance. For further enquiries please contact:<a href="mailto:internationaldevelopment@coffey.com">internationaldevelopment@coffey.com</a><strong>.</strong></p> <p>For a detailed position description and to apply for this position, please visit <a href="http://www.coffey.com/careers"><strong>www.coffey.com/careers</strong></a>and search for the job reference number <strong>495383</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Applications close 5.00pm (PNG time) 14<sup>th</sup> July</strong></p> <p><em>This program is managed by Coffey on behalf of the Australian Government.</em></p> <p><em>Coffey is an equal opportunity employer of choice and is committed to child protection.&nbsp;</em></p>

Wed, 28 Jun 2017 02:20:48 GMT

Coordinator, Inclusive Professional Development and Partnerships

<p><strong>Coordinator, Inclusive Professional Development and Partnerships </strong></p> <ul> <li>Coordinator role with the long standing Australia Awards program</li> <li>6 month contract, part time 2 days per week</li> <li>Start date as soon as possible</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Port Moresby based, Non-ARF role</li> </ul> <p class="CONLevel11"><strong>The Program</strong></p> <p>Australia Awards &ndash; Papua New Guinea is designed to promote knowledge, leadership and enduring ties between Australia and PNG. It aims to build knowledge and skills to address PNG&rsquo;s economic and development challenges through international scholarships to Australia, and the provision of in-PNG scholarships.&nbsp;</p> <p>It offers the next generation of leaders in Papua New Guinea opportunities to acquire professional and technical knowledge and skills relevant to the priorities of the Government of PNG. The program fosters people-to-people links between Australia and PNG and ensures opportunities are provided for women, people with disabilities and people from remote locations. The Awards program focuses on supporting alumni to use their skills, knowledge and networks to drive change and innovation.</p> <p>Australia Awards &ndash; PNG includes three study options:</p> <ul> <li>Australia Award Scholarships for Papua New Guineans to study primarily postgraduate courses in Australia;</li> <li>Australia Awards Fellowships &ndash; Papua New Guinea (short courses) for Papua New Guineans to undertake study in Australia, receiving an Australian qualification; and</li> <li>Australia Awards Pacific Scholarships for Papua New Guineans to study in PNG to meet critical workforce gaps.&nbsp;</li> </ul> <p>To deliver Australia Awards outcomes, there are four streams: Australia Awards; PNG and Pacific Awards; Outreach and Alumni; and Professional Development and Partnerships. Australia Awards &ndash; PNG is managed by Coffey, a Tetra Tech company, on behalf of the Australian Government.</p> <p class="CONLevel11"><strong>The Position</strong></p> <p>Reporting to the Manager, Professional Development and Partnerships, the Coordinator will support the implementation and monitoring of inclusive professional development and partnerships activities in line with DFAT guidelines and the objectives of Australia Awards PNG (AAPNG), including reintegration approaches for returning awardees living with a disability.</p> <p class="CONLevel11"><strong>The Person</strong></p> <p>The ideal candidate will have an undergraduate degree in an appropriate field of study, or relevant work experience and a knowledge of the Australian Higher Education Sector. For success in this role candidates will need to have a strong understanding of the disability sector, including the rights of and barriers faced by people with a disability. Experience in Human Resources Development, Education or Project Coordination in international development context is required.</p> <p>Candidates will have demonstrated experience in working in a small team, have high level inter-personal and communication skills, stakeholder management skills combined with a knowledge of the Government of Papua New Guinea, its structure and reform agenda as well as policies and systems that relate to Human Resources and Training.</p> <p class="CONLevel11"><strong>How to apply:</strong></p> <p>People living with a disability are strongly encouraged to apply. This is a Papua New Guinea non-ARF position based in Port Moresby. Remuneration is competitive but does not include a housing allowance. For further enquiries please contact:<a href="mailto:internationaldevelopment@coffey.com">internationaldevelopment@coffey.com</a><strong>.</strong></p> <p>For a detailed position description and to apply for this position, please visit <a href="http://www.coffey.com/careers"><strong>www.coffey.com/careers</strong></a>and search for the job reference number <strong>495383</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Applications close 5.00pm (PNG time) 14<sup>th</sup> July</strong></p> <p><em>This program is managed by Coffey on behalf of the Australian Government.</em></p> <p><em>Coffey is an equal opportunity employer of choice and is committed to child protection.&nbsp;</em></p>

Wed, 28 Jun 2017 02:20:47 GMT

Logistics and Administration Assistant

<ul> <li>Based in Vientiane, Laos</li> <li>12 months with the potential for extension</li> </ul> <p><strong>The Program</strong></p> <p>On behalf of the Australian Government&rsquo;s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT), Coffey International Development (Coffey) manages the Laos Australia Institute (LAI). The focus of LAI is human resource development working at the national level and with key government agencies. LAI manages the Australia Awards Scholarships (AAS) in Laos and the Laos Australia National Scholarships (LANS), which supports young men and women from remote and disadvantaged areas to complete a four-year undergraduate degree at a local university. LAI aims to improve participation of women in leadership and management roles, and increase the capacity of people with disability and organisations involved in disability-inclusive development.&nbsp;</p> <p class="CONLevel11"><strong>The Position</strong></p> <p><strong>Reserved for Laos Citizens</strong></p> <p class="CONLevel11">The Logistics and Administration Assistant will provide day to day logistical and administrative support to the LAI Office including administrative functions, vehicle maintenance and management and driver&rsquo;s duties as required. Reporting directly to the Senior Finance and Administration Coordinator some key responsibilities include:</p> <div> <ul> <li>Support LAI&rsquo;s office administrative operations, including office opening and closing procedures</li> <li>Driving duties including transporting personnel and delivery of documents and program materials</li> <li>Maintain motor vehicle log books, fuel register, registration, insurance and ongoing maintenance of vehicles</li> <li>Assist finance staff with data entry into Quick Books, writing cheques, paying AAS and GOLPET stipends, recording banking transactions and paying tax <ul> <li>Assist with arranging workshops, meetings and other LAI events</li> </ul> </li> </ul> </div> <p class="CONLevel11"><strong>The Person</strong></p> <p class="CONLevel11">To be successful in this role, applicants must have a Junior Secondary Certificate of Education or Study at senior secondary level or other equivalent training, including on the job training, is desirable. You will have a current driving license with a good driving record and you will have experience in a similar role in the government, private or development sector. A good level of oral and written English is required and the ability to successfully meet deadlines is essential. You will also have good interpersonal skills with demonstrated capacity to take initiative, be a team player and deal with people in a friendly and professional manner.</p> <p class="CONLevel11"><strong>How to Apply</strong></p> <p>For a detailed position description and to apply for this position please visit<a href="http://www.coffey.com/careers"><strong>www.coffey.com/careers</strong></a>click on &lsquo;career opportunities&rsquo; and search for the reference number <strong>495390.</strong></p> <p><strong>Applications close 5.00pm (Laos time) 18<sup>th</sup> July 2017</strong></p> <p><strong>For further enquires please contact: </strong><a href="mailto:internationaldevelopment@coffey.com"><strong>internationaldevelopment@coffey.com</strong></a><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><em>This program is managed by Coffey in association with Vientiane College on behalf of the Australian Government.</em></p>

Wed, 28 Jun 2017 01:47:37 GMT

Performance Management Guideline Implementation Support Adviser

<ul> <li>Opportunity for a human resource management/ performance management specialist</li> <li>Full-time, 6 month contract</li> <li>Preferred start date, September 2017</li> <li>Based in Suva, Fiji. Some travel within Fiji may be required.</li> </ul> <p><strong>The Program</strong></p> <p>The Australian Government has established the Fiji Program Support Facility (the Facility) to implement its Education, Health and Scholarship aid programs in Fiji and its Scholarship program in Tuvalu. The Facility will also support the Civil Society Sector in Fiji and delivery of Australia&rsquo;s emergency response efforts following natural disasters, as well as governance sector support when requested by the Fijian Government.</p> <p>The Civil Service Reform Management Unit (CSRMU) manages and implements a range of reforms across the civil service in Fiji and is seeking an adviser to support the Unit with the implementation of performance management guidelines across the civil service in Fiji.</p> <p>The company managing the Facility on behalf of the Australian Government, Coffey, is recruiting the position of Performance Management Guideline Implementation Support Adviser on behalf of the CSRMU. The Adviser will report to the Director, CSRMU.&nbsp;</p> <p class="CONLevel11"><strong>The Position</strong></p> <p>The Performance Management Guideline Implementation Support Adviser will work within the CSRMU to develop and deliver training packages to support the implementation of the performance management guidelines across the public service, through training and capacity development of ministry officials.</p> <p>Key responsibilities will include:</p> <ul> <li>Confirming training requirements and develop training packages and materials</li> <li>Developing a training plan and communication strategy</li> <li>Delivering initial training using train the trainer methodologies</li> <li>Monitoring the ongoing delivery of training, ensuring quality assurance mechanisms are in place</li> </ul> <p><strong>The Person</strong></p> <p>Are you an experienced human resource or performance management professional with skills in designing and delivering training packages and capacity building programs?</p> <p>The ideal candidate for this position will have relevant tertiary qualifications and previous experience implementing HRM policies, ideally in performance management; combined with experience developing and delivering training packages for government initiatives. Excellent knowledge in contemporary performance management practices and adult learning principles will be required for success. Previous experience working in the Pacific or another developing country context with knowledge of development principles will be highly regarded.</p> <p>This position is classified <strong>Category B Level 3</strong> (long term) capped at the entry level under the DFAT Adviser Remuneration Framework. Please visit <a href="http://dfat.gov.au/about-us/publications/Documents/adviser-remuneration-framework-2016.pdf">http://dfat.gov.au/about-us/publications/Documents/adviser-remuneration-framework-2016.pdf</a> for further detail on the DFAT Adviser Remuneration Framework.</p> <p class="CONLevel11"><strong>How to Apply</strong></p> <p>For a detailed position description and to apply for this position please visit<a href="http://www.coffey.com/careers"><strong>www.coffey.com/careers</strong></a>and search for the job reference number<strong>495386</strong></p> <p>For further enquiries please contact us at <a href="mailto:internationaldevelopment@coffey.com">internationaldevelopment@coffey.com</a></p> <p><strong>Applications close 6.00pm (Fiji time) 10<sup>th</sup> July 2017</strong></p> <p><em>Coffey, through the Facility, is supporting the recruitment of this position on behalf of the Fiji Government Civil Service Reform Management Unit</em></p>

Wed, 28 Jun 2017 01:27:08 GMT

Discipline Guideline Implementation Support Adviser

<ul> <li>Opportunity for a human resource management/ discipline specialist</li> <li>Full-time, 6 month contract</li> <li>Preferred start date of August 2017</li> <li>Based in Suva, Fiji. Some travel within Fiji may be required.</li> </ul> <p><strong>The Program</strong></p> <p>The Australian Government has established the Fiji Program Support Facility (the Facility) to implement its Education, Health and Scholarship aid programs in Fiji and its scholarship program in Tuvalu. The Facility will also support the Civil Society sector in Fiji and delivery of Australia&rsquo;s emergency response efforts following natural disasters, as well as governance sector support when requested by the Fijian Government.</p> <p>The Civil Service Reform Management Unit (CSRMU) manages and implements a range of reforms across the civil service in Fiji and is seeking an adviser to support the Unit with the implementation of Discipline Guidelines across the Civil Service in Fiji.</p> <p>The company managing the Facility on behalf of the Australian Government, Coffey, is recruiting the position of Discipline Guideline Implementation Support Adviser on behalf of the CSRMU. The Adviser will report to the Director, CSRMU.&nbsp;</p> <p class="CONLevel11"><strong>The Position</strong></p> <p>The Discipline Guideline Implementation Support Adviser will work within the CSRMU to continue the planning and delivery of training packages to support the implementation of the Discipline Guidelines across the Public Service, through training and capacity development of Ministry officials.</p> <p>Key responsibilities will include:</p> <ul> <li>Updating and continuing to roll out the training plan and communication strategy</li> <li>Delivering training using the training materials developed and train the trainer methodologies</li> <li>Monitoring the ongoing delivery of training, ensuring quality assurance mechanisms are in place and consistency of standards in the training delivered</li> </ul> <p><strong>The Person</strong></p> <p>Are you an experienced human resource management professional with a particular focus on disciplinary policy and skills in delivering training packages and capacity building programs?</p> <p>The ideal candidate for this position will have relevant tertiary qualifications and previous experience implementing HRM policies, ideally in relation to discipline; combined with experience developing and delivering training packages for government initiatives. Excellent knowledge in employee disciplinary policies and procedures and adult learning principles will be required for success. Previous experience working in the Pacific or another developing country context with knowledge of development principles will be highly regarded.<br /> This position is classified <strong>Category B Level 3</strong> (long term) capped at the entry level under the DFAT Adviser Remuneration Framework. Please visit <a href="http://dfat.gov.au/about-us/publications/Documents/adviser-remuneration-framework-2016.pdf">http://dfat.gov.au/about-us/publications/Documents/adviser-remuneration-framework-2016.pdf</a> for further detail on the DFAT Adviser Remuneration Framework.</p> <p class="CONLevel11"><strong>How to Apply</strong></p> <p>For a detailed position description and to apply for this position please visit<a href="http://www.coffey.com/careers"><strong>www.coffey.com/careers</strong></a>and search for the job reference number<strong>495385.</strong></p> <p>For further enquiries please contact us at <a href="mailto:internationaldevelopment@coffey.com">internationaldevelopment@coffey.com</a></p> <p><strong>Applications close 6.00pm (Fiji time) 10<sup>th</sup> July 2017</strong></p> <p><em>Coffey, through the Facility, is supporting the recruitment of this position on behalf of the Fijian Government Civil Service Reform Management Unit</em></p>

Wed, 28 Jun 2017 01:15:12 GMT

KASAI RESPONSE

<p>This role is a senior position and will provide critical support to the Country Director (CD) in new programme development and extending WCUK&rsquo;s work in the Kasa&iuml;, where the organisation is not present currently.</p> <p>The Programme Manager will be line managed by the DRC Country Director (CD), based in Kinshasa. The CD will provide direction on all issues related to programming, reporting, and monitoring and evaluation support.</p> <p>The role principal responsibilities are:<br />&bull; Conducting a needs assessment<br />&bull; Project design based on the findings from the needs assessment<br />&bull; Project Implementation<br />&bull; Financial/Asset Management<br />&bull; Personnel Management<br />&bull; Program Development<br /><br /><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>Job Description &amp; Person Specification</strong></span><br />&bull; Coordination with partner organisations and other actors in Kasa&iuml;<br />&bull; Security management<br />&bull; Other duties as assigned</p> <p><br /><strong>A) JOB SPECIFICATION: TASK AND RESPONSIBILITES:</strong><br />Responsible to: Country Director, based in Kinshasa.<br />Line Management Responsibility: WCUK Kasai Team<br /><strong>A.1. Project Coordination</strong><br />&bull; Lead and manage a needs assessment in the affected areas of the Kasai region<br />&bull; Based on the findings from the needs assessment, lead the definition of the Response strategy, and to the related operational plan.<br />&bull; Manage program budgets including monthly budget forecasting and quarterly budget revisions.<br />&bull; Provide technical leadership on program implementation methodologies in collaboration with the child protection and Education technical advisor to ensure quality and adherence to national and international standards and guidelines. .<br />&bull; Ensure that programs are implemented in a contextually sensitive manner, taking a rights based approach, and that respect humanitarian principles such as &ldquo;do no harm&rdquo;.<br />&bull; Ensure that each activity involving the participation of children is preceeded by a complete risk analysis included in the related terms of references or attached to them.<br />&bull; Work with relevant government and non-government partners to strengthen capacity on child protection, community service programming and advocate for improved child protection systems and policies. &bull; In coordination with CD, liaise with governmental officials, international and national organization on WCUK&rsquo;s behalf. &bull; Attend and contribute to relevant interagency coordination mechanisms.<br />&bull; Manage program partnerships including partner capacity building, follow-up and reporting.<br />&bull; Ensure appropriate, timely and accurate data collection against agreed indicators to enable both internal and external reporting.<br />&bull; In collaboration with the MEAL &amp; Partnerships Advisor, lead the selection of relevant new local partners by identifying qualitative selection criterias, due diligence processes and establishing selection committees the include both programme and support staff.<br />&bull; Work with CD to oversee management of grants including the timely implementation of planned activities and appropriate expenditure of funds.<br />&bull; Ensure the timeliness and quality of donor narrative and financial reports, as per donor reporting guidelines and War Child&rsquo;s reporting standards.<br />&bull; Identify funding gaps for programme acvities and assist CD in planning resource analysis to ensure that funds are found to address those gaps in annual planning.<br />&bull; Participate to programme related advocacy initiatives.<br />&bull; Ensure that security is a key and central preoccupation at every step of programme implementation. This includes the security of WCUK staff, local partners, children and beneficiaries as well as communities where projects are implemented</p> <p><strong>A.2. HR management</strong><br />&bull; Supervise Kasai Response team ,provide leadership, day-to-day support and guidance. Build the capacity of staff through mentoring and training.<br />&bull; Participate in the recruitment of competent and professional candidates fulfilling the specific requirements to each programme position, following a competitive selection process, in compliance with War Child UK&rsquo;s HR manual.<br />&bull; Ensure that every Programme staff have up to date job descriptions and performance objectives. Directly supervise the performance objective setting and review of project coordinators, in line with HR policies and procedures<br />&bull; Ensure that each Programme staff has read and accepted War Child UK&rsquo;s Child Protection policy, and that this policy is strictly applied by all throughout project implementation.<br /><strong>A.3. MEAL</strong><br />&bull; In collaboration with the MEAL Officer, ensure that each project has a comprehensive MEAL plan, outlining how monitoring data will be collected against the logframe, how the response will be evaluated, and how data and learning will be used on an ongoing basis to enhance the effectiveness of the response<br />&bull; Ensure that the database with beneficiary numbers is maintained by project staff and MEAL Officers.<br />&bull; Facilitate internal and external evaluations of the project, using these as opportunities to elicit and document achievements, challenges, learning and opportunities.<br />&bull; Collaborate with the M&amp;E officers to set up improved accountability and learning systems at the DRC mission level in accordance with our 2016-2018 country strategy&rsquo;s internal objective.<br />&bull; Work with Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning team to identify and incorporate project suitable accountability mechanisms.<br />&bull; Lead/Support Child protection assessments as required, ensuring assessment findings are documented and that all assessments include a disaggregated analysis of children&rsquo;s needs<br /><strong>A.4. Compliance</strong><br />&bull; Ensure compliance with donor Rules and Regulations in all areas including financial management, records keeping, procurement<br />&bull; Comply fully with WCUKs finance, security and child safeguarding policies and procedures, managed by the Country Director.<br />&bull; Ensure that WCUK&rsquo;s child safeguarding policy is fully operational and that all staff are well briefed on the policy and know how to report concerns or violations of the policy.<br />&bull; Ensure that receipts and supporting documents are provided to the Kinshasa based Finance and Operations Manager and Finance Officer in line with donor requirements.<br />&bull; Liaise with the Country Director and London based Programme Development and Grants Coordinator to resolve any budgeting issues.<br />&bull; Ensure partner compliance with all of the above.<br /><strong>A.4. Programme Development</strong><br />&bull; Provide Country Director with technical assistance in writing new project initiatives and proposals<br />&bull; Collaborate with Finance and Operations Manager on finances and budget tracking<br /><strong>A.5. Administration/Finances/Security/Communication</strong><br />&bull; Ensure that project implementations comply with War Child UK&rsquo;s global finances manual<br />&bull; Responsible for ensuring that projects are implemented by War Child and partner staff in full compliance with WCUK&rsquo;s security policy and procedures. Security is non-negotiable and overrides programme considerations<br />&bull; Report and record security incidents for the Country Director<br />&bull; Represent on request of Country Director, the organisation to key donors, government officials, diplomats, multilateral organisations, journalists, visiting dignitaries and in external network meetings.</p>

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 12:31:26 GMT

Food Security and Livelihoods Advisor - War Child

<p>This new global role will lead on high quality technical and advisory support in Food Security&nbsp;and Livelihoods (FSL) to support programmes in Afghanistan, Yemen, Iraq, Jordan, Uganda,&nbsp;Democratic Republic of Congo and Central African Republic with a view to expansion. The&nbsp;Advisor will work collaboratively with technical staff and consultants to support the&nbsp;development of integrated programme approaches of FSL within Child Protection and&nbsp;Education-in-Emergencies programming. You will lead on FSL Strategy Development, support&nbsp;concept notes and proposal development and utilise your FSL knowledge, experience and&nbsp;learning to inform programmes, advocacy and policy development and improve knowledge&nbsp;management at organizational, national and global levels. This role is UK-based although you&nbsp;will be expected to travel up to 30% of the time (subject to security considerations).</p> <p>You will&nbsp;have experience in supporting rapid emergency assessments, developing indicators for FSL<br />projects, monitoring and measuring the impact of FSL programmes and developing innovative<br />approaches for FSL responses in complex humanitarian settings, considering the immediate&nbsp;War Child&nbsp;Job Description &amp; Person Specification&nbsp;and longer-term needs of children and their families. You will also undertake any other reasonable duty and task that may from time to time be requested by your line manager or senior leadership consistent with the nature of the job and of responsibility.</p> <p><br /><strong>A) JOB SPECIFICATION: TASK AND RESPONSIBILITES:</strong><br /><span style="text-decoration: underline;">1) Advise, Support and Develop FSL Strategy and Portfolio (60%)</span><br />&bull; Lead on mapping of opportunities and strategy development to develop FSL portfolio by integrating FSL into the programmes of other sectors (child protection, psycho-social support and education-in-emergencies) to achieve comprehensive outcomes for children.<br />&bull; Be the global technical lead for all FSL programming, ensuring high quality technical advice is provided to all programmes, including support to cash transfer programming, in-kind distribution, livelihoods support activities and market analysis.<br />&bull; Provide technical input to and assist in all stages (identification, assessment, analysis, design, planning, implementation, monitoring, evaluation and impact) of FSL programme development.<br />&bull; Undertake the development of FSL-related tools, methodologies and organisational strategy that complement other thematic-related work.<br />&bull; Assist in the assessment of partner capacity in FSL programmes and make recommendations on the most appropriate implementation and capacity building methodologies when required.<br />&bull; Support the recruitment of FSL staff and consultants.<br />&bull; Lead on FSL promotion, training and learning events together with other officers and advisors.<br />&bull; Travel at short notice and to insecure environments to assist in FSL programme start-up, monitoring and support (depending on security)<br /><span style="text-decoration: underline;">2) Building capacity of staff and Partners in FSL (15%)</span><br />&bull; Embed international and organizational standards and good practice of FSL in programmes.<br />&bull; Strengthen FSL programming in country offices by monitoring progress, setting minimum standards and improving approaches and methodologies and building capacity through workshops, accompaniment and demonstration.<br />&bull; Provide quality oversight to and mentoring, advice and support, of in-country FSL staff and local partners. &bull; Support the development of annual country offices&rsquo; strategies and organizational strategies that reflect FSL needs in support of child protection and EiE programmes.<br />3<span style="text-decoration: underline;">) Knowledge Management, Accountability, Research and Learning (15%)</span><br />&bull; Keep abreast and apply learning, innovations and developments within the sector and support the dissemination of such across the organization. &bull; Ensure proper dissemination of information and knowledge management among relevant stakeholders through intranet and e-learning opportunities. &bull; Lead and strengthen FSL Communities of Practice, discussion fora, learning events for cross team learning and sharing to improve the quality of programming. &bull; Ensure the learning from internal and external action reviews and evaluations is disseminated and incorporated into the development of future projects.<br />&bull; Facilitate cross-organizational sharing of good practices across teams and organisations. &bull; Maintain an up-to-date knowledge of both current, and newly emerging monitoring, evaluation and accountability methods. &bull; Support the development of accountability feedback mechanisms in FSL programmes.<br />&bull; Enable WCUK to develop its capacity to deliver high quality research projects.<br />&bull; Management and development of on-line and printed resources eg. publications, case studies, learning reviews, communications evaluations and academic research.<br /><span style="text-decoration: underline;">4) External/Internal Relationships, Collaborating and Partnerships (10%)</span><br />&bull; Act as the focal point for FSL input into the Global FS Cluster, CaLP and other sectoral fora and networks<br />&bull; Develop and maintain contacts in donors, humanitarian agencies and academic institutions<br />&bull; Help identify and develop relevant partnerships and opportunities to build-up War Child&rsquo;s FSL profile. &bull; Represent and co-ordinate relevant FSL meetings, learning events and application of learning.<br />&bull; Liaise with all other War Child staff, partners and FSL focal persons as appropriate.<br />&bull; Liaise with all other War Child staff as appropriate (policy and advocacy, communication, fundraising, finance) to provide technical input in policy and communication materials.<br />&bull; Undertake any other reasonable duty and tasks that may from time to time be requested by line manager or programmes team colleagues consistent with the nature of the job and its level of responsibility</p>

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 12:22:03 GMT

Digital Marketing Manager - War Child

<p>We are looking for a <strong>Digital Marketing Manage</strong>r&nbsp;who can bring their personality, creativity and professionalism to our Fundraising and Marketing Directorate, and the wider charity.</p> <p>The Fundraising and Marketing Directorate is a hugely ambitious and high-performing department, incorporating traditional fundraising with music, arts, culture, and gaming sectors. The role will be responsible for driving digital marketing at War Child, working closely with the Digital Communications Team, and delivering a digital marketing strategy that is underpinned by data and market insight.</p> <p>The Digital Marketing Manager will sit within the Individual Giving team but directly support the Fundraising and Marketing Directorate:<br />&bull; To lead the digital marketing strategy<br />&bull; To lead on the development, implementation and reporting of digital marketing campaigns<br />&bull; To find new and exciting ways to monetise existing relationships and campaigns in the digital space in order to maximise financial value to War Child by generating donations and inspiring fundraising initiatives<br />&bull; To business partner with each fundraising and marketing functions including:<br />o Gaming Partnerships Team<br />o Music &amp; Entertainment Team<br />o Corporate Team<br />o Individual Giving Team<br /><br /><strong>Job Description &amp; Person Specification</strong><br />The role will work closely with the Head of Digital to align activities with wider digital brand and communications.<br />The role will also sit within War Child&rsquo;s digital hub which aims to improve cross-organisational use of digital through knowledge sharing and innovation.</p> <p><br /><strong>JOB SPECIFICATION: TASK AND RESPONSIBILITES:</strong></p> <p><br /><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Digital marketing strategy development:</span><br />&bull; To create a digital marketing strategy for War Child that enhances our current portfolio of fundraising activities<br />&bull; To business partner with the different teams within the Fundraising and Marketing Directorate to create digital campaign strategies and plans<br />&bull; Ensure ongoing evolution of strategy and plans in response to the external marketplace and internal campaign/activity results<br />&bull; To proactively research latest digital marketing trends and emerging fundraising technology<br />&bull; To participate in War Child&rsquo;s supporter engagement strategy and development of integrated marketing and communications plans</p> <p><br /><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Campaign management:</span><br />&bull; Working closely with Fundraising Department and the Communications Department to create and implement digital marketing campaigns that includes creative development and testing, channel testing, budgeting and reporting &bull; To directly manage in-house PPC, display, native, social and retargeting marketing campaigns &bull; To manage KPIs (including conversion rates, return on investment, and number of new donors acquired) to provide full reporting on digital and fundraising conversions &bull; Provide recommendations and optimisation based on analysis to improve campaigns efficiency (allocation of spending, geo-location, devices, etc.) &bull; Refine retargeting campaign segmentation to increase ROI, reconversion and develop cross-selling &bull; Leverage new online targeting capabilities to capture new audiences and increase engagement rates Monitoring and reporting: &bull; Responsible for monthly campaign reporting against agreed KPIs (including CPM, CPC, click-through rate, cost per lead, conversion rates) &bull; Customise and work within online dashboards (including Google Analytics / Google Tag Manager, Google Adwords, Facebook Ads, other) &bull; Utilise strong analytical ability to evaluate the user experience across multiple channels and touch points &bull; To develop a digital campaign evaluation framework to ensure learnings are applied for future activity</p>

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 12:17:42 GMT

Finance Assistant - War Child UK

<p>This role is central to the smooth operation of War Child&rsquo;s day to day UK financial processing&nbsp;and reporting during a period of exceptional growth. It is expected to support the UK Finance<br />Adviser and Head of Finance in the continued development and implementation of War Child&rsquo;s&nbsp;overriding financial management and reporting framework and financial policies.</p> <p><br />JOB SPECIFICATION: TASK AND RESPONSIBILITES:</p> <p><br /><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>UK financial Management:</strong></span><br />&bull; Processing of invoices from suppliers, ensuring that invoices are authorized in<br />accordance with the Delegation of Authority policy and coded to correct account and<br />cost centre.<br />&bull; Processing payments to suppliers and other staff members for expenses claims.<br />&bull; Answering queries from suppliers and other staff members regarding payments.<br /><br /><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>Job Description &amp; Person Specification</strong></span><br />&bull; Maintaining petty cash and reconciling petty cash to balances on PS Financials.<br />&bull; Reconciling credit card statements to credit card control accounts.<br />&bull; Preparation of sales invoices and recording them on PS Financials.<br />&bull; Liaising with fundraising team to ensure all income from all sources is correctly receipted, recorded, and allocated to source and intended use; with similar allocation of relevant expenditure. Ensuring that all cash and cheques received are prepared for banking.<br />&bull; Processing of payroll journal on monthly basis<br />&bull; Ensuring that intercompany accounts are up-to-date and reconciled<br />&bull; Ensuring that PS Financials nominal ledger is up to date and accurate for all payments made, including staff expenses, company credit cards, standing orders and direct debits.<br />&bull; Undertake manual filling of documents as required.<br />&bull; Carrying out reconciliations of bank accounts.<br />&bull; Providing assistance in the preparation for the annual audit.<br />&bull; Preparing and maintaining prepayment and accrual schedules.<br />&bull; Reconciliation of control accounts on monthly basis.<br /><strong>Financial policies &amp; procedures:</strong><br />&bull; Working with the finance team to develop the financial policies &amp; procedures to support the growing organisation, with a particular input concerning UK specific processes.<br />&bull; Ensuring that all personnel within the UK headquarters adhere to agreed organisational financial policies &amp; procedures at all time.<br />&bull; Performing other financial duties as delegated by the UK Finance Adviser / Head of Finance.</p>

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 12:12:59 GMT

MEAL Coordinator

<div class="earcu_posdescription"> <div class="earcu_posdescriptionnote"> <p><span><strong><span>The Role</span></strong></span></p> <p>The country MEAL Coordinator will ensure the development and implementation of an effective and coordinated MEAL framework and system of the Oxfam Programme in Iraq, in accordance with Oxfam standards. They will&nbsp;define and shape the strategic objectives and priorities for the programme MEAL strategy and MEAL team across 3 field offices, involving collaboration with other programme units (e.g. technical teams, affiliates in-country).&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Contract Length</strong>: 12 months&nbsp;(renewable)</p> </div> </div> <div class="earcu_posdescription"> <div class="earcu_posdescriptionnote"> <p><strong>Benefits</strong>: Oxfam offers staff a comprehensive benefits package including annual leave entitlements, sick pay provision, medical cover plus opportunities for learning and development.</p> <p><strong>Salary:</strong>&nbsp;This role is Global C1. It is Oxfam&rsquo;s policy to hire at the minimum to middle of the band, depending upon the skills and experiences of the strongest candidate.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Location:</strong>&nbsp;The role is based in Erbil with frequent travel to field offices.</p> <p><strong>Applicants:</strong>&nbsp;This role is open to both national and non nationals. Successful candidates who will be required to relocate internationally to take up the role will be provided with a competitive international relocation package.</p> </div> </div>

Sat, 24 Jun 2017 15:59:57 GMT

Humanitarian Funding Adviser (INT3613)

<p>Oxfam has adopted an ambitious new resource mobilisation strategy that seeks to build more strategic partnerships with bilateral and multilateral donor agencies to increase our income, influence and programme impact. Humanitarian emergencies account for a large proportion of Oxfam&rsquo;s programmatic income and work.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Through mutually beneficial relationships, we seek to create new opportunities for Oxfam to collaborate more effectively with donor partners in tackling poverty and inequality through a variety of different channels &ndash; including technical cooperation, learning exchanges, policy dialogue, or generating more resources &ndash; in order to improve development outcomes for people living in poverty.</p> <h1>&nbsp;</h1> <p><strong>What we are looking for</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>You will work in a high performing team to develop and lead on Oxfam&rsquo;s strategic relationships with the UK Department for International Development, and the Disasters Emergency Committee. You will have a strong background in mobilising and managing funds for humanitarian emergencies, be knowledgeable about all of the major institutional humanitarian donors, and be able to lead an organisation-wide strategy. At the same time, you will be able to advise others on accessing and managing funds from institutional humanitarian donors.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>You will be both a &lsquo;doer&rsquo; and strategic thinker &ndash; someone who relishes variety in a role and who has the skills to operate in a variety of complex and dynamic contexts: creating momentum for internal projects, coordinating the funding for delivery of an emergency response, developing and implementing longer-term donor strategies, and providing donor-related capacity building support to colleagues in country and regional offices. You should be a creative problem solver, a diplomat, a capacity builder, and a knowledge repository of donor information.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>How to apply</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This is an opportunity for an exceptional, dedicated, and highly motivated professional, with a strong commitment to Oxfam's values and beliefs. If you believe you are the candidate we are looking for, please download the full job description and apply online by clicking the below button.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>We are committed to ensuring diversity and gender equality within our organisation.</p>

Fri, 23 Jun 2017 12:37:00 GMT

Part-Time Nursery Assistant (CHR0183)

<p>We are looking for an enthusiastic lunchtime nursery assistant to join our small, friendly nursery team.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Based within Oxfam&rsquo;s headquarters, we provide a supportive and caring environment within which the children in our care can grow.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The successful applicant will have some experience of caring for children and have a genuine interest in meeting their needs. The position will work alongside the other nursery practitioners to care for the children during the lunch period, ensuring it is a positive, social experience. They will also work alongside the other lunch time assistant to prepare and serve lunch for the children, maintaining high standards of health and hygiene in our kitchen.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>A level 2 qualification in childcare and/or a food hygiene qualification is desirable but not essential.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Training on the above may be offered for the right candidate - this role offers the successful applicant the opportunity to develop their child care skills in a supportive environment.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>We are committed to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children and young people and expect all staff and volunteers to share this commitment. The successful applicant will need to be subject to a background disclosure check by the Disclosure &amp; Barring Service (formally CRB) before any appointment can be confirmed.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>To apply for this position please click on the link below or for more information contact Maria Thorpe on 01865 472264/01865 472461 or email&nbsp;<a href="mailto:mthorpe@oxfam.org.uk">mthorpe@oxfam.org.uk</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><em>Please note the closing date for this role is Sunday 23 July however it may close early if a sufficient number of applications have been received.</em></strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p>

Fri, 23 Jun 2017 12:25:34 GMT

Senior EFSVL Coordinator (INT3597)

<p><strong>Oxfam&nbsp;</strong>works with others to overcome poverty and suffering. As an Oxfam employee, you will join a team of professionals that is part of the international confederation of 17 organizations networked together in 94 countries. As part of a global movement for change, we are working together to end world poverty and injustice.</p> <p><strong>Oxfam in South Sudan</strong></p> <p>Oxfam has been working in South Sudan since 1983, devoted to empowering people against poverty. In 2015, the organization consolidated its efforts to meet the needs of the most vulnerable and has reached over 1.2 million people across South Sudan with life-saving sustainable assistance.</p> <p>Oxfam Humanitarian programme currently operates through 4 Field Bases in Jonglei, 2 Field Bases in Unity State, 1 Base in Upper Nile State and Oxfam has the capacity to respond nationwide to humanitarian emergencies.</p> <p>The Development programme currently operates in Western Bahr El Ghazal and Lakes State, and through partners in the Equatorias. The current programme expansion phase is to further develop a programme in Juba, and develop a programming base in the Kapoeta&rsquo;s of Eastern Equatoria State.</p> <p>In addition to that, Oxfam South Sudan Programme includes Education and Gender Justice programming in both Humanitarian and Development programs.</p> <p>Oxfam will work through partnerships where possible, increasing the number of women&rsquo;s rights organizations partnered to 40% by 2019.</p> <p><strong>The Role</strong></p> <p>The Senior EFSVL Coordinator is responsible for internal and external coordination, technical guidance and support to design and implementation of Oxfam&rsquo;s food security activities in all areas of operation. He/She is responsible for ensuring Oxfam in South Sudan is technically strong across the sector through capacity building of staff, coordination and collaboration with other agencies, donor proposals, programme design and strategic planning ensuring high quality intervention, monitoring and accurate data collection, and deliverables within Donor and Oxfam guidelines.</p> <p><strong>What we offer</strong></p> <ul> <li>Competitive salary and subsistence benefits</li> <li>Accommodation and utility bills paid by Oxfam</li> <li>Regular paid Rest and Relaxation (R&amp;R) breaks</li> <li>Generous annual leave allowance</li> <li>Comprehensive medical insurance cover.</li> <li>Various policies supporting staff for pension, maternity, paternity, dependency leave etc.&nbsp;</li> <li>Oxfam also focus on investment in their staff through learning and development opportunities and performance management.<strong>&nbsp;</strong></li> </ul> <p><strong>Who we are looking for</strong></p> <p>We are looking for someone who has a relevant academic qualification, coupled with sstrong experience, preferably with NGOs, in Food Security and Livelihoods work in humanitarian and/or development contexts. Someone who has experience of leading teams and representing in external and internal fora. A strategic thinker with willingness to travel and work in difficult circumstances. He/she must be committed to the aims and objectives of Oxfam.</p> <p>For more details on the role see the attached Job profile</p> <p><strong>To apply</strong></p> <p>If you believe you fit the profile, please submit your application and CV detailing your experience for the post and including daytime telephone contacts and two referees,&nbsp;preferably your current line managers.</p> <p>The deadline for applications is&nbsp;<strong>7<sup>th</sup>&nbsp;July 2017</strong><strong>.&nbsp;Only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.</strong></p> <p><strong>We are committed to ensuring diversity and gender equality within our organization.</strong></p>

Fri, 23 Jun 2017 10:53:12 GMT

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